Take the 2-minute tour ×
The Workplace Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for members of the workforce navigating the professional setting. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I will be completing my 6 months of Probation Period with my current employer shortly.

The Probation Period provides a couple of benefits that Permanent Position doesn't. Permanent position provides a lot more benefits but for the time being, I do care more about those couple of benefits.

So, is it possible for me to extend my Probation Period on request?

What would be the most polite way to do so?

share|improve this question
4  
I'm guessing this is probably more down to the companies policy. Check with HR. Not sure we could answer this. It is an odd request though. –  Joe Apr 16 at 10:41
    
Can you request an extension to your probation, there is nothing stopping you, of course the company also does not have to grant an extension either. –  Ramhound Apr 16 at 12:03
2  
@JoeStrazzere - I'm guessing a far shorter notice period! –  Mike Apr 16 at 12:04
    
@Mike: Very True :P –  kmdhrm Apr 16 at 12:07
1  
The only benefit I have ever heard of that a probationary period provides, but a permanent position doesn't, is the ability to resign giving little notice. This is why asking to extend it will send alarm bells ringing in your company. –  DJClayworth Apr 16 at 13:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

So, is it possible for me to extend my Probation Period on request?

Anything is possible, although I have never heard of anyone asking to stay on probation - never mind being granted such a request.

Probationary periods are intended to be the time where both sides get to know each other, and decide if there is a good fit.

At the end of the period, deciding that it isn't a good fit is easy, and departure is quick.

If the "benefit" you are seeking by staying on the probationary period is the ability to depart quickly, it seems unlikely that a company wanting a permanent employee would be willing to extend. Why should they bother when you are giving signals that you won't be around very long? The better move from the company point of view is to part ways and quickly bring in another candidate to start their probationary period in hopes that she/he will stick around.

I usually don't offer probationary periods when I hire. The few times I have, I wouldn't have extended the worker if they asked for a probation period extension.

What would be the most polite way to do so?

As with most things, the best choice is to communicate with the people that matter, and are in a position to act on what you want.

Go to your manager and politely ask about the possibility of extending your probation. Be prepared with an explanation when you are inevitably asked "Why would you want to do that?" Be prepared if the answer is "No."

An alternative would be for you to ask for a different status.

You could offer to remain as a "temporary" employee, perhaps until a new permanent candidate is found. That way, you could retain your easy-out "benefit", but still provide value to the company.

It doesn't sound as if you really want to be on Probation any longer. You just want one (or some) of the things that go along with being on Probation. Talk to your manager, and be clear about what you really want. It seldom hurts to ask.

share|improve this answer

You can certainly request to stay on probation. It's extremely rare and results may vary. Like all matters of this nature clear communication is really the best approach.

Based on your response a more appropriate action might be to negotiate that whatever benefits the probationary period offers to be added to your permanent position. Odds are if a probationary position is offering a benefit that a permanent position is not it's probably just an oversight. (Barring if it's a benefit of being able to quit without notice or similar, if that's the benefit you're hoping to keep than perhaps taking another job is in order as that would imply you're already considering quitting before you're even settled in)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.