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Am I required/expected to notify current boss that I’m looking for a new job?

I have been employed at my current job for over five years. Lately I've been looking for something new, and have even applied to a few job openings with other employers. How much information should I give my current employer. How could I use my current supervisor as a positive reference if I'm not confident in landing the new position?

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I really hope your real name isn't what I see here. Your current supervisor may also use the internet from time to time –  kolossus Nov 18 '12 at 4:24
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marked as duplicate by Jim G., ChrisF, gnat, mhoran_psprep, enderland Nov 18 '12 at 13:51

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If you want to burn down briges don't tell him. If you are a honest man talk to your employer see if he can help you out with the something more interesting and if not, try to make enough time for both to find a new job for you and a new employee for him.

It's not ok to do that behind his back. If he finds out, he will felt betrayed, bridges will be burned immediately and he will try to find a new employee before you find a new job.

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In some companies telling your boss you are looking for another job will get you marched out of the building. Also if the company is thinking of letting you go they'll give you the legal minimum notice which won't be enough time for you to find another job. –  ChrisF Nov 18 '12 at 11:44
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In my experience, all job searches are done without the knowledge of the current employer. Trying to fix things if they've already gotten to this point isn't much different from accepting a counter-offer (most who accept a counter offer still leave within a year anyway). ChrisF also raises a valid point - if you tell them you're planning on leaving, you'll be first to go if someone has to be laid off due to budgets, or if security is a risk. Finding new employee for the company should not be the OP's concern at all, and transition of knowledge to someone else is the purpose of giving notice. –  alroc Nov 18 '12 at 12:44
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Wow look how many minuses! I've done both things. And I regret when I did not told my employer I'm leaving. The other company I've left has open door for me for anything. One of my employees that did the same thing as I have open door to come back to us whenever he wants no matter if we have open position or not. –  mojsilo Nov 20 '12 at 7:39
    
+1 if a company is going to march you out when you tell them you are looking for another job do not have to worry about burning down the bridge by not telling them since the bridge is going to be burned either way. Most employers respect it when someone who has been with them for a while lets them know before they start looking. –  Chad Oct 9 '13 at 21:47
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