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I am considering adding BlueJ, an integrated Java environment specifically designed for introductory teaching, to my CV. But I am not sure if this is OK or not.

In what sort of situations is it OK to add specific software programs like this to my CV?

Not sure if it matters or not, but I'm a freshly graduated computer science engineer.

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You might be interested in this Programmers SE question: Listing editors and IDE's in your resume?, depending on your use of it. –  jcmeloni Dec 27 '12 at 16:30
    
Hi @ALJIMohamed - I've edited your question a bit to make it on-topic for this site, and have voted to reopen it. It still needs some other votes from other users to get reopened, or you can try flagging it for a moderator to reopen immediately and explain that it's been edited to be on-topic now. –  Rachel Dec 28 '12 at 15:02
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@ALJIMohamed To answer your question though, things you should consider before adding software to your CV: Is it relevant for the job you're applying for? Is it widely recognized/used by the industry? Do you have other experience you could use to demonstrate your knowledge instead of listing the software specifically? The primary purpose of your CV is to get you a job, so if the specific software listed will help you get that job, definitely list it. If not, keep it off as it will detract from other details on your CV that could help you get the job :) –  Rachel Dec 28 '12 at 15:46
    
The edits made to this post do bring it more in-line with our goals, so I've reopened this post. For best success in ensuring this is a successful reopen, my suggestion is to try to write answers that apply to any field, not just software development. –  jmort253 Dec 28 '12 at 21:18
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends.

If the technology or skill is related to the position you are going for then I'd say include it. It shows that you have a wider knowledge of the area.

If the technology or skill is something that is really specific to your current job and of no relevance to anyone outside your current organisation then there is no need to include it. In some cases it could even backfire, making you seem insular and incapable of working in more mainstream areas.

These are just the two ends of the spectrum. It will depend on the specific skill and the specific position you are going for and making the choice on whether to include it is hard. Put yourself in the position of the interviewer - would seeing this technology or skill on someone's CV make you more or less willing to hire them? Ask yourself which of the two extremes above really apply in this case.

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Here are some questions you should ask yourself about software you are considering adding to your CV:

  • Is the software relevant for the job you're applying for?

    If you're applying for a job that uses that specific software, then having it listed on your resume is more likely to make your resume stand out from the other resumes in the pile.

  • Is the software widely recognized and used within the industry?

    If nobody recognizes the software, or if it's irrelevant to the industry you're applying for, its pointless to put it on your CV as it will just be extra text that someone reviewing your CV will have to glance through.

  • Do you have other experience you could use to demonstrate your knowledge instead of listing the software specifically?

    Ideally it would be better to demonstrate your knowledge through work experience if possible, since proof of real-world experience with that software is better than simply claiming you are familiar with the software.

The primary purpose of your CV is to get you an interview and a job, so if the specific software you are considering including will help you get that job, definitely list it. If not, keep it off as it will detract from other details on your CV that could help you get the job instead :)

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Your resume should match the position you apply for as close as possible with respect to software. If the role description includes specific software knowledge, include it into the resume. Then you will easier get through screening by HR and recruiters with little domain knowledge.

Note that specifying specific software suites might make you look a bit like a product specialist rather then a generalist in some field.

You should do some background check what software suits the company you apply for uses. If you know SAP but you apply for a job at a company running Dynamics, you might well just type "proficiency in ERP software suites" or similar. Note that this is just to make you through the screening to the interview.

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