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These are "behavioral" interview questions and they are best answered with something that is known as the "STAR" technique.

  • Situation: The interviewer wants you to present a recent challenge and situation in which you found yourself.
  • Task: What did you have to achieve? The interviewer will be looking to see what you were trying to achieve from the situation.
  • Action: What did you do? The interviewer will be looking for information on what you did, why you did it and what were the alternatives.
  • Results: What was the outcome of your actions? What did you achieve through your actions and did you meet your objectives. What did you learn from this experience and have you used this learning since?

The point of these questions is to gauge whether or not you will be someone that can get along with others. What the interviewer is looking for are authentic answers that illustrate you are a reasonable and diligent person with integrity. The theory behind behavioral interviews is that your past behavior is an indicator of what you will do in the new position. That's why they want real and specific instances from past experiences.

The hard part (and it really is HARD) is being able to recall past experiences that answer the question. There is no short-cut for that. The good news is that you can prepare by looking at a bunch of behavior interview example questions. There aren't an infinite number of possibilities. Just reflect on past jobs and how problems/conflicts were resolved.

These are "behavioral" interview questions and they are best answered with something that is known as the "STAR" technique.

The point of these questions is to gauge whether or not you will be someone that can get along with others. What the interviewer is looking for are authentic answers that illustrate you are a reasonable and diligent person with integrity. The theory behind behavioral interviews is that your past behavior is an indicator of what you will do in the new position. That's why they want real and specific instances from past experiences.

The hard part (and it really is HARD) is being able to recall past experiences that answer the question. There is no short-cut for that. The good news is that you can prepare by looking at a bunch of behavior interview example questions. There aren't an infinite number of possibilities. Just reflect on past jobs and how problems/conflicts were resolved.

These are "behavioral" interview questions and they are best answered with something that is known as the "STAR" technique.

  • Situation: The interviewer wants you to present a recent challenge and situation in which you found yourself.
  • Task: What did you have to achieve? The interviewer will be looking to see what you were trying to achieve from the situation.
  • Action: What did you do? The interviewer will be looking for information on what you did, why you did it and what were the alternatives.
  • Results: What was the outcome of your actions? What did you achieve through your actions and did you meet your objectives. What did you learn from this experience and have you used this learning since?

The point of these questions is to gauge whether or not you will be someone that can get along with others. What the interviewer is looking for are authentic answers that illustrate you are a reasonable and diligent person with integrity. The theory behind behavioral interviews is that your past behavior is an indicator of what you will do in the new position. That's why they want real and specific instances from past experiences.

The hard part (and it really is HARD) is being able to recall past experiences that answer the question. There is no short-cut for that. The good news is that you can prepare by looking at a bunch of behavior interview example questions. There aren't an infinite number of possibilities. Just reflect on past jobs and how problems/conflicts were resolved.

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These are "behavioral" interview questions and they are best answered with something that is known as the "STAR" technique.

The point of these questions is to gauge whether or not you will be someone that can get along with others. What the interviewer is looking for are authentic answers that illustrate you are a reasonable and diligent person with integrity. The theory behind behavioral interviews is that your past behavior is an indicator of what you will do in the new position. That's why they want real and specific instances from past experiences.

The hard part (and it really is HARD) is being able to recall past experiences that answer the question. There is no short-cut for that. The good news is that you can prepare by looking at a bunch of behavior interview example questions. There aren't an infinite number of possibilities. Just reflect on past jobs and how problems/conflicts were resolved.