Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
2 added info
source | link

TestsPersonality tests tell your prospective recruits that you are an impersonal employer, that you don't care to get to know them but would rather let some test tell you what they are like. Not a good start to a relationship where the intention is to help people grow and shine. Not only that, studies (and here) show that they are not good predictors of job performance.

Rather than trying to find this information from a test, you might consider improving your interview process. When we interview, we start with a phone interview which covers experience, education, and skills. The in-person interview focuses on soft skills. We list for ourselves the traits we are looking for and we select questions (usually about 20 of them) designed to elicit information about the specific aptitudes. Questions typically ask for the candidate to give examples from their past work experience that will demonstrate this skill.

Example: I need someone with good problem-solving skills, so I might ask what steps the person takes to solve a problem, and then ask for an example of a time they have used those steps to solve a problem. Usually I have some things I am looking for in an answer (do they break the problem down into parts, do they consider the urgency of the problem, do they collaborate with others to solve, do they talk about how they get information to help solve the problem), but sometimes they surprise me with answers I did not anticipate.

Example: You can google for sample questions. Try "interview questions for coachability" - I did and found this question: "What’s most important to you about your relationship with your boss/manager and what type of management style works best for you?" You could follow this with, "Can you talk about a manager from your past where you had a relationship that really helped you grow?" If they start telling you about a manager who was very hands-off and trusted them to figure things out their own way, you might be looking at an employee whose learning style does not mesh with your needs.

The other thing you might want to think about is spending plenty of time in your onboarding process explaining your work culture so your new hires know what to expect. In particular, talk to them about how feedback works in your organization, what work ethic you expect, how you expect them to approach problems, how you want them to report their concerns... A lot of younger workers come into the workforce not understanding "how work works" and they need it explained.

Have a check-in at about 3 months and correct any misperceptions they have about the workplace. If they are not meeting expectations with regard to soft skills, give them feedback about what you need.

Tests tell your prospective recruits that you are an impersonal employer, that you don't care to get to know them but would rather let some test tell you what they are like. Not a good start to a relationship where the intention is to help people grow and shine.

Rather than trying to find this information from a test, you might consider improving your interview process. When we interview, we start with a phone interview which covers experience, education, and skills. The in-person interview focuses on soft skills. We list for ourselves the traits we are looking for and we select questions (usually about 20 of them) designed to elicit information about the specific aptitudes. Questions typically ask for the candidate to give examples from their past work experience that will demonstrate this skill.

Example: I need someone with good problem-solving skills, so I might ask what steps the person takes to solve a problem, and then ask for an example of a time they have used those steps to solve a problem. Usually I have some things I am looking for in an answer (do they break the problem down into parts, do they consider the urgency of the problem, do they collaborate with others to solve, do they talk about how they get information to help solve the problem), but sometimes they surprise me with answers I did not anticipate.

Example: You can google for sample questions. Try "interview questions for coachability" - I did and found this question: "What’s most important to you about your relationship with your boss/manager and what type of management style works best for you?" You could follow this with, "Can you talk about a manager from your past where you had a relationship that really helped you grow?" If they start telling you about a manager who was very hands-off and trusted them to figure things out their own way, you might be looking at an employee whose learning style does not mesh with your needs.

The other thing you might want to think about is spending plenty of time in your onboarding process explaining your work culture so your new hires know what to expect. In particular, talk to them about how feedback works in your organization, what work ethic you expect, how you expect them to approach problems, how you want them to report their concerns... A lot of younger workers come into the workforce not understanding "how work works" and they need it explained.

Have a check-in at about 3 months and correct any misperceptions they have about the workplace. If they are not meeting expectations with regard to soft skills, give them feedback about what you need.

Personality tests tell your prospective recruits that you are an impersonal employer, that you don't care to get to know them but would rather let some test tell you what they are like. Not a good start to a relationship where the intention is to help people grow and shine. Not only that, studies (and here) show that they are not good predictors of job performance.

Rather than trying to find this information from a test, you might consider improving your interview process. When we interview, we start with a phone interview which covers experience, education, and skills. The in-person interview focuses on soft skills. We list for ourselves the traits we are looking for and we select questions (usually about 20 of them) designed to elicit information about the specific aptitudes. Questions typically ask for the candidate to give examples from their past work experience that will demonstrate this skill.

Example: I need someone with good problem-solving skills, so I might ask what steps the person takes to solve a problem, and then ask for an example of a time they have used those steps to solve a problem. Usually I have some things I am looking for in an answer (do they break the problem down into parts, do they consider the urgency of the problem, do they collaborate with others to solve, do they talk about how they get information to help solve the problem), but sometimes they surprise me with answers I did not anticipate.

Example: You can google for sample questions. Try "interview questions for coachability" - I did and found this question: "What’s most important to you about your relationship with your boss/manager and what type of management style works best for you?" You could follow this with, "Can you talk about a manager from your past where you had a relationship that really helped you grow?" If they start telling you about a manager who was very hands-off and trusted them to figure things out their own way, you might be looking at an employee whose learning style does not mesh with your needs.

The other thing you might want to think about is spending plenty of time in your onboarding process explaining your work culture so your new hires know what to expect. In particular, talk to them about how feedback works in your organization, what work ethic you expect, how you expect them to approach problems, how you want them to report their concerns... A lot of younger workers come into the workforce not understanding "how work works" and they need it explained.

Have a check-in at about 3 months and correct any misperceptions they have about the workplace. If they are not meeting expectations with regard to soft skills, give them feedback about what you need.

1
source | link

Tests tell your prospective recruits that you are an impersonal employer, that you don't care to get to know them but would rather let some test tell you what they are like. Not a good start to a relationship where the intention is to help people grow and shine.

Rather than trying to find this information from a test, you might consider improving your interview process. When we interview, we start with a phone interview which covers experience, education, and skills. The in-person interview focuses on soft skills. We list for ourselves the traits we are looking for and we select questions (usually about 20 of them) designed to elicit information about the specific aptitudes. Questions typically ask for the candidate to give examples from their past work experience that will demonstrate this skill.

Example: I need someone with good problem-solving skills, so I might ask what steps the person takes to solve a problem, and then ask for an example of a time they have used those steps to solve a problem. Usually I have some things I am looking for in an answer (do they break the problem down into parts, do they consider the urgency of the problem, do they collaborate with others to solve, do they talk about how they get information to help solve the problem), but sometimes they surprise me with answers I did not anticipate.

Example: You can google for sample questions. Try "interview questions for coachability" - I did and found this question: "What’s most important to you about your relationship with your boss/manager and what type of management style works best for you?" You could follow this with, "Can you talk about a manager from your past where you had a relationship that really helped you grow?" If they start telling you about a manager who was very hands-off and trusted them to figure things out their own way, you might be looking at an employee whose learning style does not mesh with your needs.

The other thing you might want to think about is spending plenty of time in your onboarding process explaining your work culture so your new hires know what to expect. In particular, talk to them about how feedback works in your organization, what work ethic you expect, how you expect them to approach problems, how you want them to report their concerns... A lot of younger workers come into the workforce not understanding "how work works" and they need it explained.

Have a check-in at about 3 months and correct any misperceptions they have about the workplace. If they are not meeting expectations with regard to soft skills, give them feedback about what you need.