3 good lord
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Though many answers have given the obvious answer of "you are not required to work on a flight outside of working hour (expected effort)", some critical aspects of how the workplace extends beyond office walls have been left out of all answers.

  1. Though the flight is on your personal time, you are sharing that time with a co-worker. As such, your conduct is partially reflective of your professional image. Your choices will impact that image. There is "what happens in vegas..." clause when co-workers are around.
  2. The position of the co-worker you travel with has impact, here.
    • If they are your boss or another sr. leader, assume you need to conduct yourself as though in the office. (unless you have many years of repartérapport)
    • If they are a peer-in-responsibility, you must consider how their impression of you may be shared. See #1.
    • If they are on your team (a report), you must be aware of what image you set regarding the level of expectation you'll make of them later.
  3. Decide how they see your level of effort and preparedness in the office. Regardless of whether this is a right or wrong impression.
    • If they think your are unprepared, your choice on what to do on the plane can contribute to a rumor / image that you don't prepare for the work needed. If you're not meeting expectations for performance, it'll almost certainly come back to haunt you.
    • If they think you're prepared, jovially engage them about why you need to spend your personal time to prepare more, when your performance is already quite well.

Every interaction you have with a colleague is another time you will

  • develop your leader / mentor relationship with them
  • develop knowledge among your peer group
  • demonstrate the value you bring to the company, in the eyes of company leaders
  • have your previous behavior be remembered when someone else's role changes (a peer becomes a manager).

If any of this seems unlikely to you, keep calm and carry on, you'll see it all one day. Or not. But it will affect you.

Though many answers have given the obvious answer of "you are not required to work on a flight outside of working hour (expected effort)", some critical aspects of how the workplace extends beyond office walls have been left out of all answers.

  1. Though the flight is on your personal time, you are sharing that time with a co-worker. As such, your conduct is partially reflective of your professional image. Your choices will impact that image. There is "what happens in vegas..." clause when co-workers are around.
  2. The position of the co-worker you travel with has impact, here.
    • If they are your boss or another sr. leader, assume you need to conduct yourself as though in the office. (unless you have many years of reparté)
    • If they are a peer-in-responsibility, you must consider how their impression of you may be shared. See #1.
    • If they are on your team (a report), you must be aware of what image you set regarding the level of expectation you'll make of them later.
  3. Decide how they see your level of effort and preparedness in the office. Regardless of whether this is a right or wrong impression.
    • If they think your are unprepared, your choice on what to do on the plane can contribute to a rumor / image that you don't prepare for the work needed. If you're not meeting expectations for performance, it'll almost certainly come back to haunt you.
    • If they think you're prepared, jovially engage them about why you need to spend your personal time to prepare more, when your performance is already quite well.

Every interaction you have with a colleague is another time you will

  • develop your leader / mentor relationship with them
  • develop knowledge among your peer group
  • demonstrate the value you bring to the company, in the eyes of company leaders
  • have your previous behavior be remembered when someone else's role changes (a peer becomes a manager).

If any of this seems unlikely to you, keep calm and carry on, you'll see it all one day. Or not. But it will affect you.

Though many answers have given the obvious answer of "you are not required to work on a flight outside of working hour (expected effort)", some critical aspects of how the workplace extends beyond office walls have been left out of all answers.

  1. Though the flight is on your personal time, you are sharing that time with a co-worker. As such, your conduct is partially reflective of your professional image. Your choices will impact that image. There is "what happens in vegas..." clause when co-workers are around.
  2. The position of the co-worker you travel with has impact, here.
    • If they are your boss or another sr. leader, assume you need to conduct yourself as though in the office. (unless you have many years of rapport)
    • If they are a peer-in-responsibility, you must consider how their impression of you may be shared. See #1.
    • If they are on your team (a report), you must be aware of what image you set regarding the level of expectation you'll make of them later.
  3. Decide how they see your level of effort and preparedness in the office. Regardless of whether this is a right or wrong impression.
    • If they think your are unprepared, your choice on what to do on the plane can contribute to a rumor / image that you don't prepare for the work needed. If you're not meeting expectations for performance, it'll almost certainly come back to haunt you.
    • If they think you're prepared, jovially engage them about why you need to spend your personal time to prepare more, when your performance is already quite well.

Every interaction you have with a colleague is another time you will

  • develop your leader / mentor relationship with them
  • develop knowledge among your peer group
  • demonstrate the value you bring to the company, in the eyes of company leaders
  • have your previous behavior be remembered when someone else's role changes (a peer becomes a manager).

If any of this seems unlikely to you, keep calm and carry on, you'll see it all one day. Or not. But it will affect you.

2 edited body
source | link

Though many answers have given the obvious answer of "you are not required to work on a flight outside of working hour (expected effort)", some critical aspects of how the workplace extends beyond office walls have been left out of all answers.

  1. Though the flight is on your personal time, you are sharing that time with a co-worker. As such, your conduct is partially reflective of your professional image. Your choices will impact that image. There is "what happens in vegas..." clause when co-workers are around.
  2. The position of the co-worker you travel with has impact, here.
    • If they are your boss or another sr. leader, assume you need to conduct yourself as though in the office. (unless you have many years of reportéreparté)
    • If they are a peer-in-responsibility, you must consider how their impression of you may be shared. See #1.
    • If they are on your team (a report), you must be aware of what image you set regarding the level of expectation you'll make of them later.
  3. Decide how they see your level of effort and preparedness in the office. Regardless of whether this is a right or wrong impression.
    • If they think your are unprepared, your choice on what to do on the plane can contribute to a rumor / image that you don't prepare for the work needed. If you're not meeting expectations for performance, it'll almost certainly come back to haunt you.
    • If they think you're prepared, jovially engage them about why you need to spend your personal time to prepare more, when your performance is already quite well.

Every interaction you have with a colleague is another time you will

  • develop your leader / mentor relationship with them
  • develop knowledge among your peer group
  • demonstrate the value you bring to the company, in the eyes of company leaders
  • have your previous behavior be remembered when someone else's role changes (a peer becomes a manager).

If any of this seems unlikely to you, keep calm and carry on, you'll see it all one day. Or not. But it will affect you.

Though many answers have given the obvious answer of "you are not required to work on a flight outside of working hour (expected effort)", some critical aspects of how the workplace extends beyond office walls have been left out of all answers.

  1. Though the flight is on your personal time, you are sharing that time with a co-worker. As such, your conduct is partially reflective of your professional image. Your choices will impact that image. There is "what happens in vegas..." clause when co-workers are around.
  2. The position of the co-worker you travel with has impact, here.
    • If they are your boss or another sr. leader, assume you need to conduct yourself as though in the office. (unless you have many years of reporté)
    • If they are a peer-in-responsibility, you must consider how their impression of you may be shared. See #1.
    • If they are on your team (a report), you must be aware of what image you set regarding the level of expectation you'll make of them later.
  3. Decide how they see your level of effort and preparedness in the office. Regardless of whether this is a right or wrong impression.
    • If they think your are unprepared, your choice on what to do on the plane can contribute to a rumor / image that you don't prepare for the work needed. If you're not meeting expectations for performance, it'll almost certainly come back to haunt you.
    • If they think you're prepared, jovially engage them about why you need to spend your personal time to prepare more, when your performance is already quite well.

Every interaction you have with a colleague is another time you will

  • develop your leader / mentor relationship with them
  • develop knowledge among your peer group
  • demonstrate the value you bring to the company, in the eyes of company leaders
  • have your previous behavior be remembered when someone else's role changes (a peer becomes a manager).

If any of this seems unlikely to you, keep calm and carry on, you'll see it all one day. Or not. But it will affect you.

Though many answers have given the obvious answer of "you are not required to work on a flight outside of working hour (expected effort)", some critical aspects of how the workplace extends beyond office walls have been left out of all answers.

  1. Though the flight is on your personal time, you are sharing that time with a co-worker. As such, your conduct is partially reflective of your professional image. Your choices will impact that image. There is "what happens in vegas..." clause when co-workers are around.
  2. The position of the co-worker you travel with has impact, here.
    • If they are your boss or another sr. leader, assume you need to conduct yourself as though in the office. (unless you have many years of reparté)
    • If they are a peer-in-responsibility, you must consider how their impression of you may be shared. See #1.
    • If they are on your team (a report), you must be aware of what image you set regarding the level of expectation you'll make of them later.
  3. Decide how they see your level of effort and preparedness in the office. Regardless of whether this is a right or wrong impression.
    • If they think your are unprepared, your choice on what to do on the plane can contribute to a rumor / image that you don't prepare for the work needed. If you're not meeting expectations for performance, it'll almost certainly come back to haunt you.
    • If they think you're prepared, jovially engage them about why you need to spend your personal time to prepare more, when your performance is already quite well.

Every interaction you have with a colleague is another time you will

  • develop your leader / mentor relationship with them
  • develop knowledge among your peer group
  • demonstrate the value you bring to the company, in the eyes of company leaders
  • have your previous behavior be remembered when someone else's role changes (a peer becomes a manager).

If any of this seems unlikely to you, keep calm and carry on, you'll see it all one day. Or not. But it will affect you.

1
source | link

Though many answers have given the obvious answer of "you are not required to work on a flight outside of working hour (expected effort)", some critical aspects of how the workplace extends beyond office walls have been left out of all answers.

  1. Though the flight is on your personal time, you are sharing that time with a co-worker. As such, your conduct is partially reflective of your professional image. Your choices will impact that image. There is "what happens in vegas..." clause when co-workers are around.
  2. The position of the co-worker you travel with has impact, here.
    • If they are your boss or another sr. leader, assume you need to conduct yourself as though in the office. (unless you have many years of reporté)
    • If they are a peer-in-responsibility, you must consider how their impression of you may be shared. See #1.
    • If they are on your team (a report), you must be aware of what image you set regarding the level of expectation you'll make of them later.
  3. Decide how they see your level of effort and preparedness in the office. Regardless of whether this is a right or wrong impression.
    • If they think your are unprepared, your choice on what to do on the plane can contribute to a rumor / image that you don't prepare for the work needed. If you're not meeting expectations for performance, it'll almost certainly come back to haunt you.
    • If they think you're prepared, jovially engage them about why you need to spend your personal time to prepare more, when your performance is already quite well.

Every interaction you have with a colleague is another time you will

  • develop your leader / mentor relationship with them
  • develop knowledge among your peer group
  • demonstrate the value you bring to the company, in the eyes of company leaders
  • have your previous behavior be remembered when someone else's role changes (a peer becomes a manager).

If any of this seems unlikely to you, keep calm and carry on, you'll see it all one day. Or not. But it will affect you.