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The solution to the immediate problem, the final report, = is to get someone to proof read it for you. Then get someone else to proof read that. Between the 2 you should have a clean write up.

Unless you have a need for accommodation then I see no reason to bring up the dyslexia. Being slow and careful when writing up documents and emails is not a bad thing. In fact over time I have had to throttle my self back when writing and frequently review what i write to make sure I am properly communicating it. Until your speed becomes an issue there is no reason to bring it up.

If a manager does say something to you about it, then I would probably talk with them about your dyslexia, and explain that your slower writing speed is how you compensate for it. Until it is an issue, your sharing the details is more likely to cause problems, rather than solve them. As much as we try and want to be free of prejudice, we are human and it is harder to let go of preconceived notions than we admit. Sharing it may lead to your manager assuming problems exist where there are none, and trying to make accommodations you do not want or desire. This could also lead to being passed over promotion not because of your inability to do the job, but because they fear your dyslexia will cause problems. And you will never know if you were passed over because you disclosed your dyslexia rather than because someone else was better for the job.

The solution to the immediate problem, the final report, = is to get someone to proof read it for you. Then get someone else to proof read that. Between the 2 you should have a clean write up.

Unless you have a need for accommodation then I see no reason to bring up the dyslexia. Being slow and careful when writing up documents and emails is not a bad thing. In fact over time I have had to throttle my self back when writing and frequently review what i write to make sure I am properly communicating it. Until your speed becomes an issue there is no reason to bring it up.

If a manager does say something to you about it, then I would probably talk with them about your dyslexia, and explain that your slower writing speed is how you compensate for it. Until it is an issue, your sharing the details is more likely to cause problems, rather than solve them. As much as we try and want to be free of prejudice, we are human and it is harder to let go of preconceived notions than we admit. Sharing it may lead to your manager assuming problems exist where there are none, and trying to make accommodations you do not want or desire. This could also lead to being passed over promotion not because of your inability to do the job, but because they fear your dyslexia will cause problems. And you will never know if you were passed over because you disclosed your dyslexia rather than because someone else was better for the job.

The solution to the immediate problem, the final report, is to get someone to proof read it for you. Then get someone else to proof read that. Between the 2 you should have a clean write up.

Unless you have a need for accommodation then I see no reason to bring up the dyslexia. Being slow and careful when writing up documents and emails is not a bad thing. In fact over time I have had to throttle my self back when writing and frequently review what i write to make sure I am properly communicating it. Until your speed becomes an issue there is no reason to bring it up.

If a manager does say something to you about it, then I would probably talk with them about your dyslexia, and explain that your slower writing speed is how you compensate for it. Until it is an issue, your sharing the details is more likely to cause problems, rather than solve them. As much as we try and want to be free of prejudice, we are human and it is harder to let go of preconceived notions than we admit. Sharing it may lead to your manager assuming problems exist where there are none, and trying to make accommodations you do not want or desire. This could also lead to being passed over promotion not because of your inability to do the job, but because they fear your dyslexia will cause problems. And you will never know if you were passed over because you disclosed your dyslexia rather than because someone else was better for the job.

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The solution to the immediate problem, the final report, = is to get someone to proof read it for you. Then get someone else to proof read that. Between the 2 you should have a clean write up.

Unless you have a need for accommodation then I see no reason to bring up the dyslexia. Being slow and careful when writing up documents and emails is not a bad thing. In fact over time I have had to throttle my self back when writing and frequently review what i write to make sure I am properly communicating it. Until your speed becomes an issue there is no reason to bring it up.

If a manager does say something to you about it, then I would probably talk with them about your dyslexia, and explain that your slower writing speed is how you compensate for it. Until it is an issue, your sharing the details is more likely to cause problems, rather than solve them. As much as we try and want to be free of prejudice, we are human and it is harder to let go of preconceived notions than we admit. Sharing it may lead to your manager assuming problems exist where there are none, and trying to make accommodations you do not want or desire. This could also lead to being passed over promotion not because of your inability to do the job, but because they fear your dyslexia will cause problems. And you will never know if you were passed over because you disclosed your dyslexia rather than because someone else was better for the job.