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I know there's a similar thread to this, however I feel like I'm in a different position since I'm only officially tied to my current company for the next month (they may or may not extend my internship period).

Would it be wrong to come for an interview at a another company?

And If I do come, how could I explain to them that I'm currently working for a company but they may not hire me for the next few months without sounding like I'm using their company as a backup?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Dukeling, scaaahu, Erik, gnat, Mister Positive Oct 13 '17 at 11:32

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    Trial (probation) period or internship? Those things are very different. A probation period is common for regular employment and having a backup lined up in case that doesn't work out is unusual. Seeking different employment for after an internship would be perfectly normal. "For a month" is a bit ambiguous, I assume you mean "for the next month" rather than "since a month ago". – Dukeling Oct 13 '17 at 3:12
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    Ask your current employer how the internship is going when you are half-way through! Most employers view internships as a recruitment method rather than a way of getting things done, and will be interested in making sure you stick around if they intend to make you an offer. – JonathanS Oct 13 '17 at 8:24
  • @Dukeling it's for a probation/ trial period. I contacted them before I accepted the trial offer. I haven't start working yet actually, and about to start in a week. It could possibly end in mid November, or can be extended into an actual internship for another 2 or 3 months. – Checkered123 Oct 13 '17 at 12:43
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You go and explain that you have an internship which is expiring in a month. They may ask if you would take a job with the company if they extended after the internship. You explain that yes you would, but you also are looking for other possibilities to ensure you get the best position for yourself after the internship is up and you don't want to just limit yourself to one option.

You might need to explain more and it might cause them to not want you, but that shows you are willing to go where the best position is and not just settle for the same company. Also, if you get an offer you can compare it to a possible offer from the company you interned with and possibly negotiate. Be sure you get where you want to work though.

  • Just to clarify, I'm on a probation period. Would that make any difference to what I should and should not do? – Checkered123 Oct 13 '17 at 12:13
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Would it be wrong to come for an interview at a another company?

I would say no, as long as it does not interfere with your current tasks or you go on a day off or authorized leave.

Going to interviews while still being employed is quite common actually; you usually don't want to wait until you leave to start looking for other jobs so you minimize your unemployment gap. In other words, you usually want a place to land before you jump (otherwise where are you jumping to?)

How should I explain to them that I'm currently working for a company but they may not hire me for the next few months without sounding like I'm using their company as a backup?

I think it is not necessary for you to explain that in such detail, so I suggest to talk about it only if they ask you about it (like your current work or similar), and if you do keep it simple.

If they ask, I would go for something on the lines of: "I am currently working, but am also looking for other opportunities and I think that your company could be a good fit for me".

Usually, recruiters are more interested in learning about you and your skills (and what you can bring to the company) than about the places you have worked before, so I doubt they will ask many questions about the latter. If you see them deviating, try bringing them back on track with your answers (like the example before) or with questions you have about their company.

  • "as long as it does not interfere with your current tasks or you go on a day off..." I'd argue that going to interview with another company is not something that you can justify doing on your current company's time. If you can't take time off, go before or after work, or during your lunch break. – JonathanS Oct 13 '17 at 8:21
  • I haven't start my probation period yet. I'll be starting the following week, so I do have the time to go for the interview. – Checkered123 Oct 13 '17 at 12:32
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Yes you can!

You owe your employer the agreed amount of time a day, and to give him notice in time when you plan to leave. Other than that you are a totally free being and have every right to pursue whatever goal you wish in your life, including other/better job-opportunities.

Also, you do not have to explain anything. In an interview, you just state that you are currently employed elsewhere and will be free to join the earliest at XY.

If they ask why you want to change to them, choose any personal reason like: More interesting field of work, better career chances, etc. Try to be honest, but leave out negative things and always try to connect your reasoning on why you want to join specifically this company.

Nobody expects 100% complete honesty about your private motivation - they just want somebody who is enthusiastic and seems honest.

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