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I'm interviewing for technical roles and think that my contributions to StackExchange sites deserve mention on my paper resume. This could be particularly helpful in situations where I'm not working through a recruiter who can provide a true introduction to an employer. What's the most effective way to present this information on the actual resume?

Reference URL? Separate section?

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I totally agree on an "additional info" - I usually treat it as a published paper or journal article that way - since I'm not an academic, it's not a major part of the "what I've done" section, it's more of a minor highlight.

I've also put in a little blurb, as often my reviewer is not likely to be a Stack Exchange user - I generally hover in the space between geek and management, so I have to assume my hiring manager may be quite far away from current sites with day to day answers. So I often put a blurb that explains why one should click the link:

Ranked within the top 20% of contributors in the IT Security Stack Exchange, a Q&A site for IT Security professionals. Profile found here: <insert URL>

Because I always update my resume to send to a specific opportunity, I generally trim and tweak. For example, my personal contributions to Programmers are quite managerial, as are my contributions here... so I only put them on for management jobs, I may strip it for high level independant contributor IT Security work. And I keep an eye on my ratings to find a good way to highlight my engagement with the community. Regardless of ranking, I can usually find something cool to call out.

On my most recent job change, after talking with the hiring manager for a phone screen, I got the sense that he was particularly interested in my management style and my take on how teams should be run and what the manager/team member relationship should be. (It turns out the team had experienced quite a bit of heartache the previous year and it was a major priority to get a solid collaborative manager on the team) Having gotten the sense of that, I sent a followup thank you email with a link to my profile that highlights my major answers. I voiced it as:

It was great speaking with you yesterday, I liked X and Y and Z about your organization. As we were talking, I got the sense that having strong managerial skills is a priority for this role. If you are interested, here is a link to my writing on topics of team and management communication <insert link to my profile>.

I have no idea if my future boss clicked on it (I'll have to ask him) but it did the trick. I was the only candidate who got a callback and I got the job. It's been great! :)

  • +1 for the example blurbs and for customizing your resume and follow-up to the job (it takes all of 5-10 minutes, and can really help!) – voretaq7 Apr 26 '12 at 19:45
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Include this information in an 'additional information' section at the bottom of your resume along with your SE username and a link to your profile.

Most reviewers will want to look at a current electronic copy of your resume, so the link will often be helpful to them.

  • I agree on the location. If you actively participate on a number of sites related to your field you may want to consider linking to the "Accounts" tab on your network profile rather than to a specific site profile. – voretaq7 Apr 26 '12 at 18:17

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