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I accepted a position through a recruiting agency and was told that I would be a contractor for no more than four months, at which point I would become a salaried employee, receive a substantial pay raise, and become eligible for benefits and bonuses.

Now that I've been working for a little over two months, my supervisor informed me that the company is having some financial difficulties and they won't be able to hire me until next Spring.

I have several costs to handle (health insurances, education degree, etc.), that are growing more every time. I love the company and don't want to leave but I'm not sure if I'll be able to afford to make ends meet.

Would it be acceptable to ask for an increase in my hourly wage and if so, how should I go about it, i.e., should I ask my supervisor directly or should I ask the recruiting agency to negotiate on my behalf?

marked as duplicate by IDrinkandIKnowThings, scaaahu, Dukeling, Snow, Erik Oct 25 '17 at 8:13

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    Did you ever signed something that backs up that 4 month period they agreed? – DarkCygnus Oct 25 '17 at 2:01
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    I know this has an "We have altered the deal, pray we do not alter it further." feel to it... because what is being done is not ok. It does not mean that they have the money to give you that big raise or that if they do have that money they think that you are worth that investment. Just some things to consider before you go starting to make demands. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Oct 25 '17 at 5:08
  • is this not breach of contract? was the becoming salaried ever written down any where? – Neuromancer Oct 25 '17 at 10:34
  • @Neuromancer - Contract to hire is basically a trial run as a temp. They are not obliged to hire at the end of the contract just usually do if the employee is worth hiring. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Oct 25 '17 at 14:19
  • Just get a new job, or new contract. – Fattie Oct 26 '17 at 1:23
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You should have negotiated a contracting rate that folds in those additional factors. Even bench time spent looking for the next gig. If you buy one Coke at the store, the individual price is going to be higher than if you buy a 6-pack. Good luck, but it doesn't sound like things will work out to your satisfaction. A lot of times, a Contract-To-Hire is a euphemism for contract, but they want to dangle a carrot to make you think that if you work harder, then you might get rewarded. If they really were thinking of a full-time salaried position, then they would have hired you that way out right. Even the full-time salaried offer can be suspect. Sometimes, employers will hire you as a full-time employee to avoid paying the additional markup that a savey contractor would bill. Start looking for a new job ASAP

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    yes a contractor should be charging at least 2x the full time rate for a short contract like 4 months it really should be 3x – Neuromancer Oct 25 '17 at 10:35
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Would it be acceptable to ask for an increase in my hourly wage and if so, how should I go about it, i.e., should I ask my supervisor directly or should I ask the recruiting agency to negotiate on my behalf?

Given that you obtained this through an agency I suggest you contact them first to see if they can do anything about it.

If those 4 months period are specified in the contract you signed then it seems like they are indeed taking back their word.

This is quite unprofessional, and something you should consider if you still wish to work in a place like that.

Given that you still want that job (and nothing can be done to revert this), you should try to ask for such raise to your manager or have the agency know you wish such raise. You can then decide based on their counter-offer.

As a side suggestion, it could be wise to start job hunting. Good luck, hope this helps.

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