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This question already has an answer here:

I'm not happy with my current job, mainly because I find a lot of policies to be unfair. For example we are expected to arrive early and stay late each day. I am almost at the 6 month point where I can apply to internal positions.

On a couple occasions my supervisor asked if I'm happy with the job and if I like being there. I lied and said yes. What answer should I give? What are the pros and cons of answering one way over another? She had said to tell her before we apply to any internal job postings so she can help prepare us for them, and that they will ask her for a recommendation for us.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Dukeling, scaaahu, Masked Man, Mister Positive Nov 1 '17 at 11:36

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This strongly depends on your company culture.

In a good company culture, the organization would try to match the tasks given to an employee with his/her ambition, passion and capabilities, as it gives a win-win situation.

In a poisonous company culture, whatever you say will be used against you (during my first job I was also working as freelancer, and my boss knew about it. First he implied that working as a freelancer was not a sign of commitment, then when I stopped the freelancing he implied that it was a sign of lack of ambition).

After 6 months you should have already a feeling of what the company culture is and you can judge. From what you say the manager seems to be really willing to help. If you decide to open, try to put your remarks in a positive light, highlight opportunities and propose solution, don't just throw problems and complaints expecting them to do all the solving.

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Company culture is an important factor when considering whether or not to make your feelings or intentions known, but I would put more stock in the personality of your boss.

I know of two people under the same roof at my company who took the two different approaches to this situation.

Colleague A told his boss that he wasn't happy, and his intentions were to look elsewhere. He was scolded, given less fun tasks, and generally treated with contempt. The worst part was that he didn't manage to secure a replacement job for almost a year later.

Colleague B told his boss that he wasn't happy, and his intentions were to look elsewhere. He was treated with empathy, asked if anything could be done to make things easier etc...

Same company, same culture, different outcome.

Unless you do actually want to stay at this company (which it sounds like you don't) or that you believe that your boss will treat your concerns with empathy and provide genuine support or advice, I don't see any reason that you should tell your boss or the full truth as it runs the risk of being treated unfairly in an already unfair environment (paraphrasing your words). You list policy as the main reason that you don't like your job and moving to another internal role won't be any different. The same policies will more than likely be rolled out there too.

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