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I was really impressed with the answers about salary negotiations.

This one is more like a follow-up question to that.

So, the story goes like this. I overheard a telephonic interview between my elder sister and a potential employer.

sis: I can't accept a monthly salary below X(in a polite tone).

interviewer: What are your roles and responsibilities in your current job?

sis: I currently lead two teams simultaneously.. bla..bla

interviewer: How much are you drawing currently?

sis: I currently earn Y (about half of X)

{doesn't matter to my question, though})

At the first place,why does an interviewer ask such a question? As a hiring manager, have you posed such a question?

I was surprised she did give a direct answer to the question.

How to answer that question to our advantage?

Or how to diplomatically evade from answering the question?

marked as duplicate by Masked Man, Dukeling, gnat, Community Nov 19 '17 at 13:20

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When asked "How much do you currently make?" respond, " I can't accept a monthly salary below X(in a polite tone)." They may ask again, give them the same response. Politicians do this all the time, answer the question you want to be asked instead of the question they are asking.

Sometimes some people will become insistent. If they continue, you can tell them, "I don't disclose that information." If they still persist, remember that you hold the power to walk away and it's time to demonstrate that you are aware of that by saying something like, "I'm afraid I'm not willing to disclose that information, if this prevents us from moving forward, then I understand." Again, be polite and professional. In the extremely unlikely scenario that they do not yield to you, it's not the kind of place you want to work. Places that are that inflexible and hard at negotiating for salary are not places you want to work.

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    If you've seen politicians repeating the same answer, you've probably also seen the person interviewing them getting visibly frustrated by this - not exactly the thing you want to be causing when you're trying to make a good impression. There are better ways to avoid disclosing that information (like discussing the reasons why you don't want to or can't disclose your salary). – Dukeling Nov 19 '17 at 10:16

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