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I recently had a situation in the office where I was working on a dataset all day with real progress being made, only to have the power at my station go out because some other coworker wanted to plug in a heater.

being frustrated with the situation, I thought I'd take the data set home to work on it. However my supervisor told me I since I signed an NDA I cant take home the dataset.

The problem is that it does not say that in my contract.

Being that I have presentation deadline I tried explaining that there is no issue of disclosure since accountability is being dealt with the contract i signed but it was of no avail.

Is there a professional way to deal with demands I didn't sign on?

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    Unless specifically authorized you shouldn't take any work materials home. And get into habit periodically save your work on hard drives or similar devices. – PM 77-1 Dec 24 '17 at 22:34
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    @EconJohn - So did you have the clunky autosave turned off? – MaxW Dec 24 '17 at 23:34
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    If you are at risk of losing serious work when the power to your machine is cut, you either need a better tool to work with, or a UPS on your machine. – Erik Dec 25 '17 at 7:21
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    What if you lose it on your way home or back? What if your home computer is or gets compromised? Would you be fine with the company suing you in case someone else gets their hands on the data while it's in your care? It seems like a situation that both you and the company should want to avoid. – Dukeling Dec 25 '17 at 9:09
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    Your question is what is called an xy problem on Stack Overflow. The actual problem is that you want to prevent the loss of work progress in your office. Talk about this to your manager instead of trying to implement the solution you came up with. Possible alternative solutions include a software update, a UPS or an office rule that any unauthorized unplugging is forbidden. – Roland Dec 25 '17 at 10:11
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Your supervisor told you you cannot take code home. This is normal. Companies only tend to let developers work from home on well controlled devices, as the risk of intellectual property loss increases dramatically if they release it to an uncontrolled environment.

If your co-worker powers your machine down (by accident or deliberately) you need to ensure they don't do it again.

  • Thank you. In spite of the low votes on this question and it being out of site scope, I'm glad I got some feedback. – EconJohn Dec 25 '17 at 23:42
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Is there a professional way to deal with demands I didn't sign on?

Yes.

The professional way is to listen what your supervisor and managers tell you to do or not do. Then do what you are told.

Trying to do what you want in spite of your instructions because "it does not say that in my contract" is a great way to lose a job.

  • Thank you. In spite of the low votes on this question and it being out of site scope, I'm glad I got some feedback. – EconJohn Dec 25 '17 at 23:45

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