-2

I hit my one-year anniversary at my job in October. My boss recognized my hard work by awarding me a non-standard raise of 5%. However, since then five full pay periods have elapsed, and I have not yet received the promised raise.

I've asked my boss about it every week at our weekly 1:1 what the procedure is. It was held up in HR hell for a long time because it was a non-standard raise, but I was assured that I'd be getting it this pay period (today), with all the retro pay appropriately applied. This did not happen.

I have written confirmation from my boss, the COO, and human resources that my raise has been approved and would be applied to this latest pay period.

What is my recourse here, beyond continuing to make it an issue that I'm not being paid appropriately?

This is in Florida, United States.

15
  • 1
    @Paparazzi "What's my recourse here?" is very clearly a question. I even provided steps already taken. Fail to see how that comment is constructive or improves the question.
    – sleddog
    Dec 29 '17 at 14:02
  • 3
    What do you have in writing? Dec 29 '17 at 14:05
  • 1
    @PhilipKendall My written performance evaluation and raise approval from my boss.
    – sleddog
    Dec 29 '17 at 14:09
  • 4
    @sleddog You're very confrontational for someone who's asking for help. Dec 29 '17 at 14:13
  • 1
    I made a drastic and (hopefully) heroic edit to remove the rant and bring out the relevant question underneath.
    – sleske
    Dec 29 '17 at 14:20
6

What is my recourse here, beyond continuing to make it an issue that I'm not being paid appropriately?

Sorry to be blunt, but probably: none.

It's understandable that you are annoyed, but while it is certainly frustrating that your boss (and the other departments) did not uphold their promise, it will probably be difficult to convert that promise into actual cash.

What you could try:

Talk to your boss, and ask them about the delay specifically. Then critically evaluate the answer. Best case, the raise just got delayed by red tape, and it will really come soon. Worst case, your boss promised you a raise, fully knowing you would never get it, just to manipulate you (or something in between). There's no way for us to know, and even if you find out, it may not get you money, but it may help you to better plan your next step.

At that point, there's two possibilities:

  • If you feel your boss acted in good faith, you can try finding a solution together with them. Maybe there is a way to escalate the issue, maybe they can get whatever red tape delayed things sorted out - you only know if you ask. However, be aware that your boss may have exceeded their authority with their promise, so it's possible they cannot get you the raise no matter how hard they try (e.g. because there is a payment freeze). In that case, too much insisting may backfire on you, so proceed with caution.
  • If you feel your boss cheated you by promising something they knew you would not get, then there is probably no recourse for you. It's very unlikely you'll be able to get a raise if your boss does not support you. You could in theory sue the company (or your boss) for the money because of the broken promise, but (ignoring the fact that you may not prevail in court) that would probably mean career suicide, so not worth it for a few weeks of pay. In that case you should probably try to get a different boss (or a different job) - but that's up to you to decide. If you do get a new job, you could consider suing (seeing that your career at your old employer is over), but I'd still get legal advice first to see if it's worth it.

I have written confirmation from my boss, the COO, and human resources that my raise has been approved and would be applied to this latest pay period.

(This information was added later by OP).

If you have written confirmation from someone with authority to grant the raise, that makes the situation a bit better, but not by much.

The written confirmation only really matters in court. The fact that you received written confirmation makes it seem unlikely that you are being deliberately deceived (though it's still possible), so it looks more like a genuine red tape problem. So maybe the money will come later.

However, if it turns out the raise is still not being paid, you are back to square one: Either sue, or forego the raise (no matter whether you switch jobs or not). If you found a new job, and the total amount of money you are owed is significant, you could consider suing, since the written confirmation makes is easier to prevail in court, but that's up to you to decide.

1
  • Thanks for your answer! It seems red-tapey to me, but 5 pay periods? We're at two full months now. Even for the typically glacial pace of my workplace, this is slow. It's gone through all the appropriate channels.
    – sleddog
    Dec 29 '17 at 14:42

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .