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I am a web developer in a large financial institution (~1,5k employees). Our team is composed of 3 developers and 1 supervisor. I have worked really hard in the last 3 years, including unpaid overtime and weekends. In the last three performances, i got the best score in the team. I also got a slightly higher salary than the rest, until now. In my last performance review, my supervisor said he was very happy with my work, i got a minimal 7% raise. However, he said that i wasn't being officially promoted to "senior developer", so that I could profit another raise in the near future. I knew i was underpaid, but I told myself to wait for a year and see what happens, since otherwise I was happy with everything else.

My colleague, who had been much more relaxed than me, and who had been assigned less responsibilities (I was even asked to manage an entire project on my own, i am also constantly asked to mentor juniors) and had a worse performance than me in the last two years, asked for a huge raise (~35%), just one month before the annual performance review. He threatened to leave, since he already got a job offer in another company. As a result, he got the raise he wanted, he was also promoted to senior developer. I think this is very unfair to me, because of all my work and efforts i put in this job, and it has affected me negatively since I already felt over-performing and underpaid.

In February, we have our annual performance review. Should I just wait for what my supervisor has to offer me and just look for another job if I am not satisfied? I doubt I would be promoted, since they make a very limited number of promotions in a short period. Should I tell him I am not happy with my colleague's promotion and tell him I will look for other jobs in case he does not make me at least the same raise? Or, maybe should I just leave?

closed as off-topic by Dukeling, gnat, Jim G., Masked Man, gazzz0x2z Jan 6 '18 at 22:08

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on a specific choice, such as what job to take or what skills to learn, are difficult to answer objectively and are rarely useful for anyone else. Instead of asking which decision to make, try asking how to make the decision, or for more specific details about one element of the decision. (More information)" – Dukeling, gnat, Jim G., Masked Man, gazzz0x2z
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    The fact your colleague got X or Y just tell you what the company has to offer to its employees. Nothing good will come from comparing your situation with someone's else, even more before your manager. Summarize what you want for you and edit your question. However, I think there will already be answers for them (underpaid, more responsibility) – Adam Smith Jan 6 '18 at 3:36
  • How do you know they had worse performance than you? He ask for a larger raise. Why didn’t you? I would leave out the fact you are unhappy with your colleagues performance, unless you are asked for your opinion, your colleague obviously brings something to the table – Donald Jan 6 '18 at 4:25
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    The combination of mentoring and managing a project suggests the OP is being groomed for a leadership or management job. The emergency effort to keep the colleague around may or may not interfere with the next step in the OP's career. There are only two ways to find out, wait and ask the boss. – Patricia Shanahan Jan 6 '18 at 11:40
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    Welcome to the wonderful world of office politics. I hope you have learnt the lesson that we all learn at some point: promotion has nothing to do with "hard work". Clearly "threatening to leave" is more effective in getting promotion at this company (or at least with this manager) than "hard work". It is also likely that the colleague has been "promoted" to let the manager buy some time to find a suitable replacement. Don't be surprised if this "promoted" coworker disappears from the office some day. – Masked Man Jan 7 '18 at 7:48
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Should I just wait for what my supervisor has to offer me and just look for another job if I am not satisfied?

It depends on how it works in your company/country. In some situations, it may be reasonable to talk about a raise prior to the annual performance review. If that is the case, I would most definitely ask it sooner, as many people will ask for a raise during the review.

I would look for a job prior to the raise negotiation, however. It gives you peace of mind when negotiating your salary, because you would have another option should they tell you no. I am not endorsing the usage of an offer as leverage for a raise, as it comes with lots of risks. Should you choose this path, read questions concerning "accepting a counter-offer".

I doubt I would be promoted, since they make a very limited number of promotions in a short period.

You do not know that. Your company is big enough they could promote two people in a short period of time.

Should I tell him I am not happy with my colleague's promotion and tell him I will look for other jobs in case he does not make me at least the same raise? Or, should I just leave?

NO! Do not compare your situation with his. Nothing positive will come from that. Instead, talk about your contribution to the company, your responsibilities, etc. Look for questions on "how to ask for a raise".

Should you leave or not is a decision you will have to make. You would compare your current job with other offers you have, should you take this path.

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