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I keep receiving these phone calls with a hirer who tells me "we have freelancer positions, would you be interested?", and I revocked the first time.

Then they contacted me again and had the same conversation.

This person doesn't try to social-engineer me or anything.

How should I interpret this?

  • 1
    Maybe you didn't decline clearly enough, maybe they think they can change your mind, maybe they don't remember contacting you, maybe they're just trying to bug you for some reason or maybe they have some other reason. In any case, if you want them to stop, you should start by just telling them that. – Dukeling Jan 20 '18 at 12:54
  • Is it JobSpring? – user7360 Jan 20 '18 at 17:23
  • For the same reason why telemarketers keep pestering you with credit card offers and such. You are just a human shaped number to them. – Masked Man Jan 21 '18 at 8:53
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It's not a "hirer", it's a recruitement agent. A "hirer" is someone working at a company with the power to sign contracts to hire you, this guy doesn't.

If they contact you three times, then you are talking most likely to a novice, and definitely a very badly organised recruitment agent. Because after the second call, it should be clear that any further calls within the next six months will be rather pointless.

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I've had similarly persistent recruiters contact me by email, and continue contacting me despite my having told them I'm not looking for new opportunities. The only successful method of getting rid of them has been the junk mail filter.

If this recruiter is contacting you by phone, your options are a little different. If he's calling you on your smart phone, you should be able to block the number (I know iOS has this feature, I assume android has something similar.)

If you live in a country that has a national Do Not Call list, you might be able to discourage these calls by leveraging that system.

With a variety of unwanted spam callers in the past, I've asked them for their name, the name of the company they represent and any employee ID they can give me, then I've explicitly asked them not to call again and told them I was recording the date and time for future reference. (I left it as implied that some sort of legal action would be forthcoming if they called again.) This doesn't always work, but it has had surprisingly good results over the last few years.

(I did, in fact, record some of these calls, mostly for my own edification. I haven't had any specific company/telemarketer call back often enough for me to seriously consider legal options, and I'm not even sure what options there are, if any.)

  • But the question is: why do they persist? Could it be that my previous employer wants my news and then they hire somebody to ask in an indirect manner? – Syndicate Jan 21 '18 at 15:37
  • People can and will call from different numbers; it is probably simple changing the mobile number. Or telling them to get lost. – Rui F Ribeiro Jan 22 '18 at 18:35

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