-1

In some jobs, pay happens in regular intervals and is the same amount each time. This isn't the case in every job. When the amount from paycheck to paycheck varies between each pay period, how do you tell if your getting paid the correct amount?

My last job had a lot of variability when it came to pay:

  • volunteering to work over time resulted in a higher pay rate
  • some sick days were paid
  • some sales had commission
  • small bonuses were given for things like signing customers up for e-news letter

I ended up losing the job but was told I would get paid out for unused vacation time but wouldn't get a severance fee. Given my bank statements, how can I check if the amount I was paid is correct?

Should I phone the payroll department and ask them to explain it and trust they are being truthful? Is it the payroll departments job to explain paychecks?

closed as off-topic by Dukeling, Snow, JasonJ, gnat, Chris E Jan 25 '18 at 20:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking advice on company-specific regulations, agreements, or policies should be directed to your manager or HR department. Questions that address only a specific company or position are of limited use to future visitors. Questions seeking legal advice should be directed to legal professionals. For more information, click here." – Dukeling, Snow, JasonJ
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    In AUS and UK we get payment summaries each pay period (two weeks here in AUS) detailing our hourly rate, the number of hours paid/vacation/overtime each period, and any bonuses and contributions to superannuation/pension - you should know your base salary/rate to check in your summary, or you could compare against a previous summary with vacation time. – HorusKol Jan 23 '18 at 9:47
10

Ask for a detailed pay slip when in doubt, you should receive one monthly even if in electronic form. This is a mandatory procedure in many countries.

Get acquainted with local labor laws and with your work environment.

This is the kind of stuff that you should be familiar with to look out for your rights.

If in doubt, or needing a quick consultation, ask someone more experienced in the family or ask a local accountant. Local laws vary a lot.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.