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I've been contracted for 4 months as a programmer. This is my first ever programming related job.

I was wondering if I should list contract positions on my resume? As far as I know, contracting apparently doesn't look as good on the CV. In addition to this, if my contract doesn't get extended... I will have a small duration job (of 4 months) on my resume and then possibly nothing else till I graduate. Is it worth listing on the resume?

marked as duplicate by gnat, Draken, scaaahu, Cronax, Rory Alsop Jan 26 '18 at 19:12

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The key thing here is that it's your first ever programming job.

Normally short-term contracts (less than 6 months) tend not to be listed unless that's the norm for the area of contracting that you're in. However, seeing as it's your first job I'd be tempted to list it as any experience is better than no experience at all, especially if you have plans to stay and progress in that industry.

My advice would be to list it as normal, and if you're particularly worried about the recruiter/screener picking up that it was a short-term role, you could always put (Contract) in there, I.e.

Programmer, Some company, (Contract) | Jan – Mar 2018

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This is my first ever programming related job. [...] As far as I know, contracting apparently doesn't look as good on the CV.

I wouldn't necessarily see it that way. A recruiter may see a contract position as a project with a well-defined beginning, execution time and end.

Imagine the following exchange:

-So, NegativeBreakfast, I see that you worked for Company X for 4 months as a contractor. How did that went?
-Oh, it was a very nice experience. They needed a developer to finish some new requirements, and hired me to help with that. We managed to deliver it within the specified period, and my contribution is now live. And while the project is a wrap and they do not need my services for now, the client seemed to be very happy with my work.

This would be a very nice thing to hear as a recruiter: the client needed help, you provided and left in very nice terms, demonstrating professionalism. (You may back it up with a recommendation letter.)

And, in any case, showing that you have some professional experience is much better than nothing at all.

  • I gave the first response the answer but this has a lot of useful information so thank you! :) – NegativeBreakfast Jan 24 '18 at 15:47
  • @NegativeBreakfast not a problem, it's a good answer - I upvoted it as well. =) – OnoSendai Jan 24 '18 at 16:41

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