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I am two months into this new job, and yesterday I received an invitation to an open online remote/freelancing website from my direct manager. And it was into my personal email and not through the company's email.

I went through the website, and it looked like it is a place for job seeking/hiring.

Me and boss rarely interact in one-to-one. And I asked a coworker if they received the same invitation, and they did not. Should I be worried of being let go? And how can I approach boss to know the reason behind his invitation?

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    My first assumption would be that it's an automated email that just sent the same invitation mail (plus or minus your name) to all contacts in the address book of the person who signed up there. There are a few such websites known to do that. The difference between an automated and a manual email generally tends to be pretty obvious if you know what to look for. – Dukeling Jan 25 '18 at 18:11
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    Are you sure this is not spam and not really from your manager. – paparazzo Jan 25 '18 at 18:53
  • It is his name and title, but from within the website. Similar to the ones you get from LinkedIn or Facebook, it has the format "Mr X has invited you to do this - Join Now (Clickable)" – Sandra K Jan 25 '18 at 19:11
  • @Dukeling I have to agree with this. I frequently get invitations for LinkedIn from a group email. Someone does a address book invite not knowing who is on it. – Dan Jan 25 '18 at 19:16
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    As a general rule, NEVER click on emails that you don't know, even from people you know but don't expect such an email from or never been told to expect such an email. This email has all the telltale signs of a spam. You know your boss, who rarely talks to you, would not have a valid reason to send this to you, so why did you open and click it? Get up and speak to the boss. Mr Bossman, I got a join request for X, did you meant to send that to me? Oh okay, I'll delete it right away. – Dan Jan 25 '18 at 19:17
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Should I be worried of being let go?

No one here can really answer that. You have a much better understanding of your job performance than we do.

And how can I approach boss to know the reason behind his invitation?

I would find this a bit odd, but the only way your going to know is to ask. I would say something like "Excuse me, may I ask why you sent me that invitation?".

It could be that your boss just assumed your doing freelance for some reason and thought it might be of use to you. It could also mean your boss does freelance work, and thought you would be a good fit to help him out on a project.

Don't assume anything, just ask your boss for their reasoning.

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    It could even mean that OP's boss believes the pay isn't great, and wants to use freelancing potential as an argument to convince the OP to stay. – employee-X Jan 25 '18 at 18:11
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    I wonder why this answer got a down vote.......haters gonna hate. – Mister Positive Jan 25 '18 at 19:41
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    Nah, someone aimed for the up vote button but missed. Hanlon's Razor may apply :-) – Dan Pichelman Jan 25 '18 at 19:54
  • @DanPichelman happened to me too.. – Sandra K Jan 25 '18 at 22:59
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    I asked him and It turned out it was a spam to all his address book. – Sandra K Jan 26 '18 at 16:31
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I wouldn't worry unless you have a reason to worry. Such as poor performance or you know there are some budget cutbacks on the way.

As for how to approach your boss. Direct and open is always the best approach in my opinion. Just say straight up that you received the invite and upon looking it looked like a job search board and you're concerned about your job security. He should immediately put it to rest or (unfortunately) let you know your time may be limited. But it's odd that short of performance or culture fit reasons you would be let go after only 2 months. I've had it happen to me once as a Salesforce consultant and that was because I was hired to manage 8 projects in the pipeline and the sales folks only 2 got closed. But I was aware coming in.

But have you discussed wanting to explore some freelance work on the side with anyone? Specifically your boss?

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    No I have not introduce freelancing with anyone; I actually never did freelancing. – Sandra K Jan 25 '18 at 18:07
  • @SandraK in that case I'd say the best bet is just to bring it up directly with your boss as soon as he has 15 minutes to ease your mind. Just let him know it just made you a little concerned for your job security and if there's something happening soon you'd like to prepare – BirdLawExpert Jan 25 '18 at 18:10

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