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Background info: The company I work for is in the process of hiring someone for the position of web developer. My boss pretty much left me in charge of the whole process. I try to involve him by asking his opinion in certain topics, but he tries to exclude himself as much as possible from the situation.

The actual question: I decided that the candidates qualified from the first stage will complete a 'trial' project. After contacting them and filling them in with what they needed to know, one of the candidates stated that he would start the next day. I told him that was fine and that we would get in touch via email to discuss details and clarify anything that was unclear to him.

He did not write back about a couple things that he was going to decide, so I am sending an email to ask him.

The email goes like this:

Hello John,

.... (email content here)

Jane from Smith Investments

Does this email format set an appropriate tone to the conversation? The closing in particular is important. I don't want to be overtly formal or give off an air of self-importance. I don't want to be overtly friendly neither.

The background should serve to explain that I don't have any particular position in the company nor trying to assume one. But my boss likes to delegate certain responsibilities to employees.

closed as primarily opinion-based by gnat, Mister Positive, Jenny D, David K, Draken Feb 1 '18 at 9:27

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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The closing you've chosen seems fine.

To me (though it may be my age) e-mails are less formal than letters, even though they are used for every sort of communication from love notes to important financial documents, so you don't need to go overboard when signing off.

By choosing

Jane from Smith Investments

you've clearly identified that this is a company e-mail about company business but you haven't taken on any titles etc. that aren't rightfully yours.

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Doesn't your company have a standard for email signatures? Every company where I have worked had that, some stricter than others. This leaves no room for doubts.

Example

Sabine [Last name]
Technical engineer

[Company name]
[General company contact info]
[My mobile phone number]

and then some prescribed link to our website, social media, etc.

This way you never have to think about your closing, which makes emailing a lot easier I think.

  • No we don't. I adopted a minimalist, unassuming email signature from my previous workplace, but in terms of structure, procedure and regulation my current workplace is rather happy-go-lucky. Despite my lack of love for bureaucracy, I kinda miss working in a place with some well - defined guidelines. I already sent the email, but your input is quite helpful, thanks. – Freya Jan 31 '18 at 14:50
  • Maybe you can set a trend ;) – Sabine Jan 31 '18 at 14:54
  • Even with the signature, I still sign off with a regards or a cheers over my name... Another problem we have is that our signature software applies the signature at the server, so we don't see it when composing the email – HorusKol Jan 31 '18 at 21:25

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