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I received an email that asks me to go to an interview but the location is far from my place since I need to travel by public transport. But I know that the company has difference offices in different location.

What should I write on the email to decline the position they offer me but if another chance rises, that has a position nearer to my place, to still be in the running of getting an offer?

  • Do they offer remote working in any form? – user34587 Feb 2 '18 at 8:32
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If this is a company you are interested in and the distance is the only objection, I would definitely go to the interview.

This way you present yourself and don't make a bad impression plus you have the opportunity to talk with the interviewer first hand of your need to be located in a different office. If this is not possible you can still decline if they make you an offer.

But i firmly believe that declining and asking for another chance for a different location gives a bad first impression.

Edit: On suggestion from "gazzz0x2z" there are other beneficial aspects to attending the interview like getting a better feel of the company, train yourself to pass interviews, and explaining your position far better.

  • Going to the interview has other advantages, like getting a better feel of the company, train yourself to pass interviews, and explaining your position far better. – gazzz0x2z Feb 2 '18 at 10:02
  • How would you feel as an interviewer if someone came to the interview, but told you they wouldn't be willing to make the commute? Not only would I not be impressed, I'd be mad. – user8365 Feb 2 '18 at 16:05
  • @JeffO don't flat out say you'd be unwilling - use it as part of the negotiations - if they're interested in you joining they might accommodate a different location, or offer additional salary to offset the commute, or even assist with relocation. Just be open and say "I'm really interested in working for you, but have to factor in the long commute into my decision". If they want you, they'll accommodate you. – HorusKol Feb 2 '18 at 22:25
  • @HorusKol - I agree. If the commute is a concern, you should be up front about it. If relocating is an option, then I would certainly be more open. The OP hasn't offered that as an option. – user8365 Feb 5 '18 at 15:34
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It's possible the location of the job is not actually the same as the location of the interview. Usually they will put this on the job description.

Perhaps they have a similar job opening in an office near you, either now or in the (near) future and you might get relocated.

Traveling time is something you should bring up in the interview and see if you can get a 'deal': working remotely, working some days a week at location A and other days at location B, being allowed to work on the train.

If no agreement can be made, you can always say no and ask to stay in touch in case something nearby opens up.

  • +1 - Unlike some answers, I would not be impressed as an interviewer if someone comes to an interview knowing they are not willing to make the commute. There's no reason these types of logistical things can't be asked and answered before the interview. – user8365 Feb 2 '18 at 16:03
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As others have mentioned, go to the interview. You will achieve a number of things by doing this:

  • Give a good first impression. (vs. declining all together)
  • Learn more about the company - (remote opportunities, the actual office location, etc.)
  • Give you the opportunity to inquire about the option of working out of another office.
  • Show your interest in their intrest in you.

Don't decline just because of your concerns as this is one of the core points of the interview process. This could be a great job but you won't have the opportunity if you don't at least interview.

In addition: If after the interview it doesn't work out, you now have your foot in the door which seems to be the root of your question.

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