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I have been given a job offer for a job in another country (Chiang Mai, Thailand), it is the first time I work abroad so I am not sure what to do to secure myself, should I ask for a signed contract before I leave my current job and country?

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    You even consider to leave your job and country without a signed contract? How was this contract negotiated? (Are you sure that this is not a scam?) – FooBar Feb 2 '18 at 11:42
  • This smells like a SCAM to me. You cannot act as if this is for real unless you have a contract in hand.....amazing.... – Mister Positive Feb 2 '18 at 13:48
  • I didn't say that the employer refused to provide a signed contract, I was just asking to understand how to deal with the situation, because as I mentioned by I am pretty new to this experience. – Sisyphus Feb 2 '18 at 15:22
  • Please note also that they are sponsoring my work permit, so I guess they will have to get involved somehow and prove to the government that they have contracted me in order to get the visa through. – Sisyphus Feb 2 '18 at 16:10
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Yes, absolutely !

Don't leave your job, or do anything as long as you don't have a signed contract in front of you.

A job offer is worth nothing. It is only the mere mention of a possibility of you working somewhere.

Usually for a signed contract, especially if it is abroad, they would allow you a certain amount of time before signing the contract and starting the job. That would leave you time to give notice that you're leaving to your current job and then start to planify you moving abroad.

Good luck, and as Foobar said, be certain this isn't a scam before investing yourself in anything!

  • Does the contract has to have some form? is it just a contract that signed by somebody?! Do I have to do any procedure to verify the validity of the contract? – Sisyphus Feb 2 '18 at 15:24
  • Please note also that they are sponsoring my work permit, so I guess they will have to get involved somehow and prove to the government that they have contracted me in order to get the visa through. – Sisyphus Feb 2 '18 at 16:10
  • @Sisyphus that could be another question to ask. However this contract should a legally binding document (basically saying that if they suddenly break it you can sue them). As you said, they should be the ones certifying that this contract has been validated by the government – everyone Feb 2 '18 at 17:02
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    Go back to the company and make sure you understand who is paying what. I believe the company is suppose to pay for VISA and government fees. If someone is offering you a job but needs you to pay money, that's a massive red flag. – Nelson Feb 2 '18 at 18:45

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