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Would it be acceptable - and perhaps beneficial - to list some of my cool travel experiences, say, to Istanbul, Norway, Moscow, on my resume? I'm job searching now in New York and wonder whether that could communicate to hiring managers that I perhaps have an open mind and a somewhat broader perspective. I was thinking of using one line on my resume to list some countries.

closed as primarily opinion-based by Mister Positive, gnat, Rory Alsop, scaaahu, Masked Man Feb 22 '18 at 18:17

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Do you mean business trips where you stayed at the locations for extended periods? Eg. 3+ months? – Juha Untinen Feb 21 '18 at 19:50
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In a word, no.

Employers aren't interested in travel unless it has to do with your work history. In fact, they're not interested in much of anything unless it pertains to your work history or directly how it will help you on the job.

Leave it off

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    Leave it off, for sure. – Mister Positive Feb 21 '18 at 19:34
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    Exactly. If you worked internationally and have experience with doing business in other cultures, then absolutely list it. If the job involves living or working in a country where you spent significant time immersed in the culture, list it. Otherwise, no one is going to care if you were there for a week or two on vacation – DLS3141 Feb 22 '18 at 13:08
  • @DLS3141 Exactly. If you're applying to Toyota USA it might be worthwhile to put that you have spent a lot of time in Japan and that sort of thing. – Chris E Feb 22 '18 at 14:22
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That's what the interview is for.

Make it interesting. Talk about your passions and your long terms plans and all the awesome stuff in your life then. The resume should only contain the bare minimum content to get you through to the interview. Show them the good stuff and nothing more.

Caution: I say this from experience, that if you're relying more on your resume and not your skill-set to get you through the interview process, then I'm afraid you have some real solid preparation to do.

2

No

Unless the experience is directly relevent to the job in question of course!

As a hiring manager if I see someone's extensive travel history listed on their CV it would definitely put me off. Especially if it is regular and/or relatively recent as this positively *screams" that the candidate is just looking for a job to work at for a while so they can fund their next "adventure". In the case of travel that is further in the past then I tend to think they are either desperate to sound "interesting" or trying to "stand out", or worse - they are the sort of person that will never shut up about their "life changing" year backpacking round Asia when they were 19. Ugh!

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Yes.

It's not guaranteed to help, but it can. It cannot hurt either, so you might as well leave it in.

True story, years ago I travelled for about a year. My first job after that came about because the hiring manager loved Thailand, he'd been there on his honeymoon.

My interview with him was just an hour long discussion on diving and beaches. This was for a tech job, in banking, in San Fran, which is the last place you'd think would care.

The only reason we started on the topic was that, at the bottom of my CV, was a section "countries I've travelled to".

I would always leave in anything that makes the fact that you're interesting stand out. I still keep in cool things like chernobyl or working on an elephant orphanage, and more normal spots like angkor wat, & machu picchu now.

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    This is not good advise. Employers don't care that you have traveled. – Mister Positive Feb 21 '18 at 19:52
  • Did you put it on your resume, or did this just come up naturally in conversation? I think that's a very important distinction. – user812786 Feb 21 '18 at 20:44
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    @Mister they honestly do. they want well rounded people, who have a variety of life experiences. that helps in seeing problems from different angles. traveling itself shows innate curiosity, generally an ability to communicate, and motivation. – bharal Feb 21 '18 at 20:45
  • @whrrg yes, noted and added – bharal Feb 21 '18 at 20:51
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    @dukeling id be amazed if anyone ever rejected a candidate "because they listed they they travelled in their cv", I imagine it's pretty harmless to do – bharal Feb 21 '18 at 21:30

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