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We don't have a real trainer at work. A colleague who was hired 3 months earlier than I was assigned to train me. She was irritated with me asking questions, simple or clarification & questions I ask when I thought of going back reviewing the mentioned topic.

Then her feedback about my training was too long and detailed, not even mentioning anything good I have done. And the summarized reason was that I was frustrating and a slow learner. I didn't finish the mastery of the job within the 3 month period. But I have other concerns which added to the prolonged learning. Like when they didn't help me with the system and access issues that postponed the training for 1 month.

My supervisor told me as if it was all my fault because it only happened to me. I was telling them about this issue before & since I am new to the organization, I didn't know that that prolonged system issue only happened to me, when I was always following-up on the problem with the IT staff and IT was always responding.

My question is, how do I tell these concerns I had & that the support needed wasn't provided by the person assigned to train & the supervisor without ending my chance to reapply again in the future?

  • What's your goal here? Why do you want to tell them about these concerns now, after you've been terminated? Why didn't you bring the up before? – Erik Feb 27 '18 at 16:26
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    Did they actually ask you for an exit interview or would you like to / did you ask for one? – Dukeling Feb 27 '18 at 16:31
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    This might be fairly closely related to In a job interview, how do I explain why I was fired? (in terms of avoiding what they might see as excuses). Although I can't say I'm entirely clear on the purpose of an exit interview if they're terminating you (not that exit interviews are generally much more than a formality). – Dukeling Feb 27 '18 at 17:04
  • Have you really to go to that exit job interview? If they are not interested in what you have to to say, it might be a waste of time. – Rui F Ribeiro Feb 28 '18 at 10:33
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My question is, how do I tell these concerns I had & that the support needed wasn't provided by the person assigned to train & the supervisor without ending my chance to reapply again in the future?

In short - I'm afraid you can't, really. From what you've said here:

My supervisor told me as if it was all my fault because it only happened to me.

...it sounds very much like your supervisor has sided with the person assigned to train you, and for whatever reason, believes all that they're saying. Given the above, and the potentially high turnover rate (there was no-one better to train you than someone who was only there 3 months), these all seem like red flags to me - is there a reason you may want to go back later?

In any case, the exit interview is not the time to try to bring these criticisms up (however constructive you think they may be), that time has passed. I'd advise simply saying as little as you can, staying as generic as you can, not pointing fingers, and then put the whole experience behind you.

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