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I have just started a new job 1, but really wanted this other position at Job 2.

Since 3 weeks into Job 1, Job 2 gave me an offer that pays almost 25% more and has great benefits (Job 1 does not even have a 401k, job 2 does and matching). So job 2 has:

  • better pay
  • better benefits
  • more relaxed environment/better work culture

All in all, I would have never ever thought about accepting Job 1, if Job 2 came along first...a no-brainer.

My manager in Job 1 is very stressful and even calls me about work on Friday and Saturday nights before I was even hired!

I know its normal for a 2-week notice but I am genuinely nervous about coming back to Job 1 after the notice, given my manager's temper and manners. Is it okay in this case to just provide an email about it and not come in? How do I approach this dilemma?

I had another thought, what if I volunteer at no pay, after hours for a week to basically transfer/unload my work instead of the 2 weeks?

My industry is HUGE and I rarely meet the same people so I am not worried at all about burning bridges Indiana Jones style... cue theme song

Notes: *It is at-will *I have a 1 month "contract" period whereafter the benefits will kick in (I assume this is a probation period) *Manager is high strung and makes me nervous to talk to him on this

closed as off-topic by HorusKol, Masked Man, Cronax, Dukeling, David K Feb 28 '18 at 15:17

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  • "Questions asking for advice on a specific choice, such as what job to take or what skills to learn, are difficult to answer objectively and are rarely useful for anyone else. Instead of asking which decision to make, try asking how to make the decision, or for more specific details about one element of the decision. (More information)" – HorusKol, Masked Man, Cronax
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  • 1
    Does your contract contain anything about the probation period? – L.Dutch Feb 28 '18 at 7:48
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of How can one resign from a new job gracefully? – Dukeling Feb 28 '18 at 14:30
  • If you're not worried about burning bridges, do whatever you want - what are you asking us for? Although, if you're going to violate the terms of a contract, it's probably best to speak to a lawyer first about potential consequences. What exactly are you worried your boss will do? Even them just shouting at you could get them in legal trouble. – Dukeling Feb 28 '18 at 14:33
  • don't cue theme song, it comes across as cutesy. but also lacking in seriousness. you always want to present yourself as a serious player, not someone being flippent about their career. – bharal Feb 28 '18 at 15:06
  • How much notice does your contract say you need to give? I would give your notice and work that time and tell them you dont believe it was a good fit for you there. – ayrton clark Feb 28 '18 at 15:20
9

You should give a standard 2-week notice, and leave it at that. You may just get lucky and they'll immediately escort you out and pay you anyway, freeing you to take Job 2. You may think your industry is huge, but don't burn bridges unless you have good reason too. At the end of the day, this is "you", so don't ruin your reputation over two weeks.

4

The thing about bridges and burning thereof is that you never think you are burning your last bridge, until you burn it.

You come across as lacking in enough self respect. You are entitled to many rights, but the most important right you have is the right to self-respect. Nobody else can really give you it, it's your own responsibility.

You're obviously taking job 2. To stay at job one because your manager is mean and scares you would be really letting yourself down.

All you have to do is give your notice and work your remaining hours. Interestingly, nobody expects you to work extra hours, and you don't have to work any extra hours than you're contractually obligated, so if after giving your notice you get called in on Saturday... you don't need to go. At all. What would be the worst case, they fire you?

But not giving your notice is letting yourself down. You're cheating yourself out of 2 weeks of pay, and you're not standing up for yourself, which will come in useful as you get older - you always want a past example of a tough time to rely on when the going gets tough.

So use this as a learning opportunity, give the 2 weeks notice and tough it out.

  • You might want to remove "cowardly" as you're likely to run across the "be nice" policy. – Retired Codger Feb 28 '18 at 14:50
  • @Richard fair play, done – bharal Feb 28 '18 at 15:01

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