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TL;DR:** My boss is giving me random work instead of giving me real tasks, Tried showing him im capable of bigger tasks but he keeps on giving me random stuff**

I got an offer from a company lets calls it UPP, they offered me 60% more of what other companies were paying for my skill level, plus a percentage of earnings. "We know you aren't a senior (8+ years of experience) and you don't specialize in the technologies we do (Partially), but an investor recommended you, apart from the money, we offer you high-level training (Which they did)"

The first month I did nothing but training, I always tell them I want to catch up to the other developers (which are seniors), that I'm reading and doing practices in my free time (true). I'm even doing freelance jobs to get better faster.

Im really grateful of their support and what they had taught me.

But after the first month, they CTO is just dumping random work they could do in half an hour, and make me learn something which isn't that useful. (Here "fix this", (no idea of the system they used), figure it out) And this takes me about a week to even learn, it's boring and it's frustrating.

I feel like my good skills (R&D and creative tasks) are being wasted. (I have over 8 Mone prices in competitions and many first places + Experience, so I must know something, I can work with senior level programmers side by side in what I'm good at)

I mean, they are paying me, I shouldn't be complaining, but I feel like they are just dumping random work for me not to do annoy them, like a little child. "have it ready in a week or so" let's be real, they could take less than 15 min to finish this, this is unused code, it's not even up to date

I have been constantly showing them any cool projects I do in my free time, 'so I can catch up to you guys', told other workers about what cool stuff i do, I won 2 prizes for doing applications in record time in hackathons (less than 48 hours), but they don't seem to take me into consideration. The team isn't even that big for him not to have time to spend time with me.

What to do? I don't want to offend anyone, but after 2 months I don't know what to write what my tasks are on my LinkedIn profile. (I did more for another company I do part time in, that's less than a week since I started)

I came to this job to grow and get better, but I feel like I'm getting stuck. And I already tried (paid somebody else to do it for me) to get this "jobs" done faster, they just keep sending random stuff.

marked as duplicate by Philip Kendall, Jim G., Rory Alsop, Masked Man, gnat Mar 3 '18 at 6:01

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  • this is a very bold question – bharal Mar 2 '18 at 22:23
  • There is so much here, some of which is confusing. Can you condense the story a bit as well as say what it is you are really trying to accomplish? – NotMe Mar 2 '18 at 22:41
  • You paid someone else to do the task that was assigned to you? Did I read that right? – AffableAmbler Mar 3 '18 at 1:18
  • "And I already tried (paid somebody else to do it for me) to get this "jobs" done faster" No, no, no, just no. Stop doing that, and don't tell anyone. You could get fired. See: cnet.com/news/… – Masked Man Mar 3 '18 at 1:52
  • I have a feeling this "question" is a bad attempt at trolling. – AffableAmbler Mar 3 '18 at 3:03
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Show some initiative

Seriously. You can get the tasks you are assigned done for the week in 15 minutes, so take the opportunity to use the rest of the time constructively.

Is everything in the company running perfectly? I doubt it. Almost certainly, there are big tasks / problems that have been outstanding for years.

So pick one. Work on it when you have nothing better to do. And when it's ready / nearly ready, talk to a colleague about it. Better still, present to a whole group of colleagues.

The worst case is, your solution is dismissed out of hand. But even then, you've still been paid to come to work, and you've tried your hand at a big project.

But most likely, if you've solved a real problem the company has had for a long time, you'll get the opportunity to put it live, and get the respect / credit that comes with that.

There's really nothing to lose.

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