2

(This doesn't apply to me) (Ireland)

Employee is 64 with 1 year left to retirement, working for the company for 17 years.

Employer has verbally offered 2 months pay in return for employees resignation letter, or the other option was employee would be placed on a PIP (Performance Improvement Plan) with the possibility of being fired and receive nothing.

This situation arose because of instances of (doctor certified) sick leave above what the company decided was acceptable.

Employee asked for (written) confirmation of offer, but employer declined and said the offer would be discussed after receipt of resignation letter.

Employee is willing to accept x months pay, but the company will not confirm this before resignation, which would really leave employee without a leg to stand on. Employee feels the atmosphere will be toxic if decides to go back to work on a PIP and ideally would like to avoid that.

What is the best way to approach this situation?

closed as primarily opinion-based by paparazzo, alroc, gnat, user8365, Mister Positive Mar 7 '18 at 17:41

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    I don't see how we can help. It a decision he needs to make. VTC – paparazzo Mar 7 '18 at 16:59
  • 5
    This is a legal matter, and out of scope of the workplace, so we cannot tell you to find an employment lawyer who specializes in the discrimination towards disabilities and age. I'm sorry we can't help – Retired Codger Mar 7 '18 at 17:29
  • 4
    @RutherRendommeleigh PIP stands for Performance Improvement Program. Which is almost always just an exercise in building a file for termination – Retired Codger Mar 7 '18 at 17:31
  • 4
    If I were the employee I would not resign in this situation without something in writing.... – Mister Positive Mar 7 '18 at 17:41
  • 7
    Well, your friend could just put, in their resignation letter, the terms that were discussed. "I am submitting my resignation on the condition that I receive Z months resignation pay, as discussed with X on Someday, A/B/2018 at 2pm." But given all the factors you mention, Ricard U is correct - an employment lawyer is worthwhile – bharal Mar 7 '18 at 17:41