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A month ago, for some reasons I resigned from a job position for another one although I liked my old job.

Now it's been only two weeks in my new job and I haven't found what I'm looking for, so I want to ask for my old job back and I think it's gonna be possible because I left on good terms and I have done a great job in my old position. When I resigned my boss told me that the door is always open and after I resigned he told one of colleagues that I was irreplaceable.

And now I want to ask for my job back but I don't know how to start and whether I should wait a little longer to ask or go for it asap because even though it's only been 2 weeks in my new job I know for sure that it's no fit.

closed as off-topic by Philip Kendall, Dukeling, Chris E, Retired Codger, gnat Mar 12 '18 at 20:22

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on a specific choice, such as what job to take or what skills to learn, are difficult to answer objectively and are rarely useful for anyone else. Instead of asking which decision to make, try asking how to make the decision, or for more specific details about one element of the decision. (More information)" – Philip Kendall, Dukeling, Retired Codger
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  • What were your reasons for leaving your old job? Is it possible that solutions to those problems could be solved before you get rehired? When you resigned, did your employer make a counter-offer? – djohnson10 Mar 12 '18 at 19:33
  • I left cause i wanted to see something else that would enrich my career but i found the same thing only worse and yes he tried to give me more challenging tasks and all but i have already signed the new job contract – Ad Mobb Mar 12 '18 at 19:40
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    Call him up and tell him, "Is that offer for me to return still open? I didn't realize how good I had it there and I guess it took seeing how bad it is for others to realize that." – Chris E Mar 12 '18 at 19:45
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If you are sure about your decision, contact your former employer right away, don't delay

This is a tough decision for you to make, with a lot of potential downside. This isn't a decision that you should make lightly, but you haven't asked about whether or not this is a good idea, so I won't go there. All I will say is I hope you are sure about your decision before you act.

If you are certain that this is the right decision, don't waste any time. You should contact your former employer right away, today, right now. You need to get your foot back in the door before they fill your old position, preferably before it is even posted as an open position.

Given that you have such a great relationship with your former supervisor, it might be best to start there. Talk to your old boss and tell him that you realize you have made a huge mistake. Ask for his help getting your old job back. You should take steps to insulate yourself from some of your former employer's inevitable concerns.

You will be considered a flight risk for at least a little while. You need to do some damage control. Explain to your boss that you made a huge mistake and that the old company is the BEST possible place for you to be. Make them understand that you want back in to STAY, not as a stopover to your next new employer.

  • I may have changed my mind about comments, but +1 anyway. – Retired Codger Mar 12 '18 at 20:09
  • @RichardU Thank you sir. I appreciate your consideration. – Lumberjack Mar 12 '18 at 20:19
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Yes it's a good idea to ask for your old job back now. Try to get into contact with your manager and ask if you can return.

Better to ask now than to wait for your replacement then it might be impossible. As it stands you might still have a opening.

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Some food for thought based on your description:

  • your former boss said you were irreplaceable, but apparently didn't do any counteroffer to keep you in
  • you liked your old job nevertheless you decided to leave it, so I assume the reasons were pretty serious
  • after just two weeks you want your old job back since you don't like the new one

What you risk with such a sudden come back:

  • you clearly state that you don't know what you want: you have left something you like and then want it back when you have something you don't like
  • you show you cannot commit to something

You are in the new job for only two weeks, you are still basically learning and being known. Of course in your memories the old is better than the new, since the new is still far from being experienced.

Try to recall in your mind the reasons why you left: are they gone? Are you so unhappy in the new position that this unhappiness is worse than the risks I listed above?

  • I don't want my old job back just cause i don't like this one i mean i can still look for another one, i want it back for the same reason i left it cause what i have mastered the work and felt it wasn't challenging anymore and that i should try something else that would enrich my CV but i didn't find what i was looking for and i'm sure i won't find it unless i have experience and didn't know that before i left. So i know what i want i really do so.it was just a mistake that i had to make to be sure my old job is a fit. – Ad Mobb Mar 12 '18 at 19:45
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    @AdMobb If you end up getting your old job back, don't be "looking" anymore. You need to stay there at least a year otherwise you'll look like a big d-bag and kiss that reference goodbye....unless something serious happens of course. then you do what you have to do. – Chris E Mar 12 '18 at 19:47

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