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My friend who had spent four months working as a BA, hated it and started applying for a new job on seek.

A week later he was called into HR office and asked if he was still interested in his current job and whether or not he was actively looking. He obviously said he was interested and not actively looking.

Two days before his probation period was over he was 'let go'. The reason being he apparently lacked motivation and wasn't a 'team player'. He was (at least he believed) harder woking than most people in his department (primarily because they were old and had been there awhile so were not as committed.)

This begs the question, how to apply for a new job while you are currently at one without your boss/manager finding out? I too am interested in finding a new job and I am currently employed. If you update your resume on Linkedin or Seek your manager can easily find out. What is the best way to avoid this without first quitting your job before looking?

marked as duplicate by Lilienthal Mar 22 '18 at 11:49

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  • Are you a BA as well? Depending on the country and profession, the answers could vary. Can you add these? – user34587 Mar 22 '18 at 10:51
  • Not really sure how the person's current manager found out. In general, there's no way to find out short of monitoring an employee's communication (which may or may not be legal). As a rule of thumb, it's probably best to not use company resources to do these things. – Horia Coman Mar 22 '18 at 11:09
  • How long have you been employed with your current company? If you're a fairly long standing employee or are even just outside your probation period, it would be very odd for them to fire you for seeking a new job. Think about what it costs them to fire you as opposed to letting you leave: the end result is the same but the former comes with greater risk of legal action and alienating a previous employee. Better to let you leave on good terms than kick you out the door you're already walking out of. Best case scenario - they boost your salary to keep you if you're desirable! – Tay W Mar 22 '18 at 11:32
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    Put on hold as a duplicate since it's a common question that's been extensively covered before with a few main "canonical" questions. – Lilienthal Mar 22 '18 at 11:51
  • @Kozaky I work in IT as a PHP developer. – Jake Naughton Mar 22 '18 at 11:52
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As with any private information you want to keep off the internet, you simply don't update your resume publicly on these large sites. The downside is, companies/recruiters won't see you, but hey, you already have a job right?, you're in no rush and you are going to pick your next job carefully. Not to mention, you won't get tons of spam emails/calls from recruiters, that alone is worth the downsides.

You will have to be a bit more proactive, and sign up for job alerts that match your search criteria, then apply on what you find using a private copy of your resume.

I say all this to say I don't know how necessary this is. I just recently changed jobs and I put my information all over the internet. My current company was actively hiring positions like mine, and it was a complete shock when I gave my notice. There are just a flood of candidates out there, so unless your company specifically searches out you, they probably aren't going to find you. It's just easier for them to put out a job and wait for applicants to come to them.

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