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I submitted my resignation yesterday and it was not smooth at all. I want to discuss it a little bit and get feedback on my side.

So first I submitted by E-Mail. I planned of sending an email to give a heads up and then meeting CEO and discuss details with my written letter. I feel it was bad decision and mistake on my part because they were pissed I sent an E-Mail rather than doing it in person.

It was a visa sponsored job in Germany and they took my decision to quit very personally and were visibly angry, partly because they sponsored my visa. I quitted in around ~6 months because of very dis-satisfaction with working conditions and working hours. I tried to work, but I just couldn't bear working conditions there. They are not very horrible, but it's just I have worked in much better companies. And there were several things about them I didn't like.

They asked what I didn't like. When I tried explaining, I felt they were not very open to feedback and they just tried to justify themselves without letting me speak.

There is one problem I specifically want to talk about. Two days ago, I was assigned a new one-month long project (for 1 person)(we are software development agency). But yesterday I finally had appointment at local employment agency and I got their permission to change job. My probation period was also ending this month, so if I had not resigned yesterday, I would have got stuck here for 2 months because my notice period is 2 months after probation period vs 2 week now. They were angry why I didn't told them earlier. It was because I couldn't resign until I had permission from govt because of visa. They literally told me why I didn't told them I am looking for a new job.

I want to leave on good terms. So I am thinking of completing the project over weekend and work extra after end of probation period. I don't want to do it, but I don't want them to hate me either. They literally told me my resignation so soon is leaving a very negative perception of me in their eyes.

My questions are:

A) Is resignation over E-Mail considered unprofessional?

B) Am I professionally obliged to work on a visa sponsored job even if I am not satisfied with working conditions and I tried 6 months to make it work?

C) Am I supposed to give head-ups to my employer that I am planning to quit until I am not sure if I am allowed to legally?

D) What are my professional obligations towards unfinished projects at the time of resignation. They just accepted the project 2 days ago and said if I had resigned a day earlier, they wouldn't have accepted the project. Am I oblige to finish it? I have an option to work Monday-Sunday and finish it as much as possible before I leave. But there is one more problem. I only have 1 month since my day of quitting to accept a new job. If I don't by then, I have to apply for another visa, and later change to work visa. That will cause me to be unemployed for a while and without any salary. I don't suppose they will pay me if I am unemployed because of waiting for visa. So I just want to use this time instead to find a good job ASAP.

closed as primarily opinion-based by gnat, Masked Man, HorusKol, Lumberjack, Dukeling Mar 30 '18 at 14:43

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • You cannot change the past - so your questions are a mute point. I also doubt that they would wish you to work for free and not being employed by them – Ed Heal Mar 30 '18 at 11:31
  • Question A is covered here, all your other questions are covered by several related question on this site that deal with when to hand in notice and when you should give advance notice of a job search. The rest of your post isn't a practical question and if you want to "discuss" anything do so in The Workplace Chat. But I think your experience can be summarised as an employer that reacted inappropriately to your resignation, nothing more. – Lilienthal Mar 30 '18 at 11:37
  • @EdHeal Yes but if you do some introspection, you can behave more positively in similar situation next time. – NotAQuitter Mar 30 '18 at 11:38
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    What is your goal here? You have already resigned. What do you want to gain by wondering why they are angry? It is their problem, not yours. Move on. – Masked Man Mar 30 '18 at 11:39
  • @MaskedMan See my last comment (just above yours) – NotAQuitter Mar 30 '18 at 11:43
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A) Is resignation over E-Mail considered unprofessional?

Sorry but yes.. unless you had literally no other way of getting in contact with your boss you should have talked to them directly. Either face to face or if that weren't feasible over the phone.

B) Am I professionally obliged to work on a visa sponsored job even if I am not satisfied with working conditions and I tried 6 months to make it work?

Unless there is a contractual or specific visa requirement to do so then no, you aren't obliged. You're an employee not an indentured servant. It is considered somewhat impolite though.

C) Am I supposed to give head-ups to my employer that I am planning to quit until I am not sure if I am allowed to legally?

No. Generally letting them know you are planning to leave before you are actually in a position to do so is a bad idea, they could have used your probation period to let you go as soon as you told them (subject to the two week notice of course) and left you high and dry. You did the right thing in waiting.

D) What are my professional obligations towards unfinished projects at the time of resignation. They just accepted the project 2 days ago and said if I had resigned a day earlier, they wouldn't have accepted the project. Am I oblige to finish it? I have an option to work Monday-Sunday and finish it as much as possible before I leave. But there is one more problem. I only have 1 month since my day of quitting to accept a new job. If I don't by then, I have to apply for another visa, and later change to work visa. That will cause me to be unemployed for a while and without any salary. I don't suppose they will pay me if I am unemployed because of waiting for visa. So I just want to use this time instead to find a good job ASAP.

Your obligations are what is in your contract, nothing more, nothing less. You are obliged to work as per your contractual hours for your notice period. Any projects left unfinished aren't, strictly speaking, your problem.

That said given that they have taken this so badly it might not be a bad idea to offer a compromise in order to mend the relationship somewhat - if nothing else you may well want a good reference from this employer at some point in the future. I'd be tempted to offer a longer notice period (within the bounds of the month you mention) in order to see if you can get the project finished. There's no need to be doing weekends or evenings or anything like that. Not an indentured servant remember!

Edit to add: While I understand while your employer is feeling a bit annoyed - they now have the headache of how to get this project finished after all they are definitely behaving pretty unprofessionally. People leave jobs all the time, it's just part of doing business. You haven't really done anything wrong and they shouldn't be pouting this much and that says more about them than it does about you.

  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. Edit appropriate responses into the answer; chat in the linked chat room. – enderland Mar 30 '18 at 15:05
  • Agreed. I think it is okay to send a email that you have important matters to discuss and want a one on one immediately. After telling him in person, it's okay to send a follow up email to your boss to have "proof" that you are turning in your notice to leave. – Dan Mar 30 '18 at 17:45
  • @Dan in some countries you are even obliged to send a letter stating the resignation. – Adam Smith Apr 1 '18 at 22:16

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