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I have a team of 6 and I'd like to talk to them about techniques for giving and receiving feedback (specifically the Situation/Behaviour/Impact model).

I'd love to illustrate this through interaction, and have them complete a fun exercise either in pairs or (preferably) all at once that will deliberately lead them to become (mildly) frustrated with each other. I'm not looking for them to trade blows, just put them in a situation whereby they will actually have feedback they want to give each other but in a non-threatening/silly situation.

Once it's over we would then practise giving and receiving feedback about what happened using the SBI model.

I'm after suggestions as to what we could do in an office environment. Conflicting instructions for each person or unclear goals for what is actually required is a possibility, but I'm stuck trying to come up with something workable and fun.

closed as too broad by gnat, user34587, paparazzo, scaaahu, Erik Apr 3 '18 at 8:03

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  • It'd be worth updating this when you have a more specific plan in mind, otherwise this could be raised as too broad. What research into these kinds of exercises have you already done? – user34587 Apr 3 '18 at 7:21
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    I have a better idea. Just skip the "fun" exercise and let everyone go home early. That will boost team far more than some silly games. – Masked Man Apr 3 '18 at 17:11
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something workable and fun

Team building exercises are very rarely "fun" in my experience even when they are trying to be, and the sort of thing you are talking about where you're intending to artificially stir up conflict sounds like pretty much the exact opposite of both fun and team building.

Seriously I think there is every chance that doing something like this will blow up in your face.

A couple of ways it could go wrong:

  • Two or more employees who have existing tension or frustrations with each other will bring that baggage with them and the manufactured frustration will escalate.

  • The team spends the entire exercise getting frustrated with each other only to discover that they have all been "had" and then unite in their frustration at you

Seriously.. don't do this!

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