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I have come to accept my hand writing skills SUCK.

So I've been thinking about this- when I interview someone for a job they have applied to, what are the thoughts on if I bring my laptop to take my notes on it? I can type much quicker than I can write. What do you think?

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  • Do you have to show your notes to anyone right after the interview or you can just hide the paper when taking notes and then type the notes later?
    – Sandra K
    Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 15:41
  • What's the context of the interview? Are there multiple people on the interview team, or just you? Are you able to prepare any material ahead of time?
    – dwizum
    Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 15:45
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    Also - "What do you think?" is essentially off-topic according to the norms for Stack Exchange. It would be better if you could reword your question. For instance, you could ask for tactics on how to make notes during interviews, etc. Is your concern that you'll miss something, or just that you're embarrassed by your handwriting?
    – dwizum
    Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 15:46
  • Do you have any standardized process which require you top take notes or is this just for your own guidance? If the latter you might simple take much less notes, because in the end it is a binary decision (hire/not hire) and you will not require a detailed response.
    – dirkk
    Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 15:59
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    I went to an interview a few months ago where the two interviewers had their own laptop. They were side by side, the laptops on the table hide their body to the neck. By handing them a copy of my resume, I got the same feeling when I give my passport at the border and they question me about my visit. Personally, I got a vibe that I was clearly an outsider. I do not think it represent well the culture of the company.
    – Tom Sawyer
    Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 18:26

3 Answers 3

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I have to say no.

My handwriting is also terrible, but I type my notes & observations afterwards, so nobody else but me has to suffer through it.

If I was the interviewee, I'd find an interviewer on a laptop to be, at best, distracting, and at worst disrespectful.

You're meant to be getting an overall impression of the candidate, and that includes watching how they respond to questions, how their body language is when presenting or whiteboarding, and how things like eye contact work. It's harder to judge these when you're looking at a keyboard, IMO.

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  • Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. Commented Apr 17, 2018 at 2:57
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Is is generally frowned upon. The candidate should have your full attention. That is, after all, the objective of the interview.

If your company allows, a viable option is to record the the whole interview in video for future reference (or, alternatively, an audio recorder) if the candidate gives their agreement.

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  • 1
    Some companies do not allow recording of the interviews. Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 19:16
  • @TheSoundDefense good point - edited.
    – OnoSendai
    Commented Apr 16, 2018 at 19:25
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    Some interviewees might also be a put off by the prospect. I'd ask if they're okay with it before starting.
    – Erik
    Commented Apr 17, 2018 at 5:03
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It's ok under three conditions:

  1. The laptop is very quiet
  2. You explain the interviewee that you would like to take some notes on your laptop and ask them whether they are ok with that
  3. You are able to take notes and think at the same time. I once had an interview where the interviewer was taking notes on his laptop but evidently he was so focused on typing that he didn't understand my answers.

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