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Can I submit a letter of resignation on April 18, 2018 effective August 31, 2018; included in my letter, my request for change in work status from Full-time to Part-time effective May 2018.

Management are trying to force employees out. I want to protect myself at the same time give myself freedom to interview (without penalty hence the PT status).

I also want to protect myself against any actions by management (i.e. writeups), after the resignation letter is submitted.

closed as off-topic by AffableAmbler, Masked Man, scaaahu, gnat, alroc Apr 18 '18 at 2:57

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    Can you? Yes. Is it a good idea to? Probably not something we can answer without more details. – AffableAmbler Apr 17 '18 at 0:25
  • Management is trying force employees out; want to protect myself at the same time give myself freedom to interview....without penalty hence PT status; Any actions by management (i.e. writeups), after resignation letter submitted, possibly viewed as retaliation or harassment providing me protection, is my hope! Yes....????? – user86076 Apr 17 '18 at 0:35
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    Saying "I intend to quit in 6 months" doesn't protect you from write-ups, or everyone would do it. – Erik Apr 17 '18 at 10:50
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You can do that, but there is not any guarantee that your employer will agree to your terms.

If you have a valid business reason(IE one that is not easily reduced to I don't like doing my job anymore), then I would contact your manager and explain it to them, and ask if it would be possible to reduce your hours to a level where you are requesting.

In many states, giving notice of intent to quit, allows the employer to terminate employment earlier than the original notice, with out the obligations to pay unemployment benefits. Make sure you know your states laws before you submit notice.

TL;DR

Handing in your notice now, effective in August, as an attempt to "protect yourself" is an official very bad idea - at best it would do nothing to protect you, and at worst it would have the exact opposite effect you're looking for

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    "In many states, giving notice of intent to quit, allows the employer..." - even in jurisdictions where that is not the case, employers have no obligation to honour a 4.5 month notice period when the agreement/contract/law only requires 2 or 4 weeks... – HorusKol Apr 17 '18 at 5:25
  • They have to accept the resignation, but they can give you a shorter notice. So “I quit with 4 1/2 months notice” can lead to “we fire you with two months notice” but not to “that’s too long, you have to stay”. – gnasher729 Apr 17 '18 at 8:29
  • ...or of it's at-will, they can boot you out the door anytime they like. – Blrfl Apr 17 '18 at 9:35
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    Right - if the employer is already trying to shed staff, I would expect the OP's tactic to be met with "okay, you're done, today is your last day." They'll take this as a blessing, they don't have to pay you unemployment or severance and they don't have to include you in statistics in terms of the supposed impending layoffs. – dwizum Apr 17 '18 at 12:57
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    Just to clarify, in case it wasn't clear: handing in your notice now, effective in August, as an attempt to "protect yourself" is an official very bad idea - at best it would do nothing to protect you, and at worst it would have the exact opposite effect you're looking for. – dwizum Apr 17 '18 at 12:59
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When management is trying to force employees out, then giving them a reason to let you go now isn't a good plan.

Unless you have a contract that allows for or requires them to accept the conversion to part-time, they could decide that your last day will be the day you wanted to stop working full-time. You would no longer be able to meet the conditions of employment, so you are expendable.

If they are forcing people out the door, they should be willing to allow employees to use vacation hours to interview. Ones who find employment elsewhere will be happy to leave for their new job. The alternative is to fire people, who will then leave under unpleasant conditions.

The switch to part-time will reduce your hours, and your pay, and could impact your benefits.

Your goal is to work as long as you can till the end of August, or until you find a good job, therefore asking for special treatment would seem to jeopardize that goal.

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