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I'm applying for a remote job at StackOverflow so there's a question which states:

Tell us about your remote work environment. Please include information about your hardware.

How should I answer it and what is expected to be a good answer as I've not ever worked remotely.

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    A good answer should be the truth. If they're going to interview you remotely for a programming job and your computer slows down because you have a skype session going, a couple of internet tabs and an IDE open, that might be a problem. If your area is known for lousy internet, power outages, or weather events, tell them what you've done to mitigate those issues. If you need extra hardware and an extra redundant internet connection from an alternate provider, tell them that as well. Something that can easily be remedied with cash shouldn't be a problem, but you do need to be upfront about it. – Stephan Branczyk Apr 22 '18 at 7:52
  • You can't really mitigate against their biases (maybe, I shouldn't have said anything about that, forget I said that part, it's not that important). I'll delete that comment. – Stephan Branczyk Apr 22 '18 at 8:06
  • You should also consider the "hardware" part of the question a hint that you're going to have to provide your own and adjust your salary demands to account for the purchase of a separate, work-only machine that meets their demands. – Blrfl Apr 22 '18 at 11:35
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Well, if you are replying for a remote software development job, then often the expectation is that you will provide the hardware to do the job. And there is the expectation that you have a quiet place where you can work undisturbed.

So a good answer (to get the job) is "I have a study that can be locked so that I can work undisturbed, and I have an XYZ computer with two 27" monitors". A bad answer is "I have a six year old laptop that I can use in a corner of the kitchen, while looking after my four little children".

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    In the couple of processes I applied for remote work, they were very clear they would buy me whatever hw I needed for the job, including brand new macbook pros. – Rui F Ribeiro Apr 22 '18 at 13:52
  • I don't have a suitable hardware or environment as I never fell a need for it ,so should I tell that to them as other suggest in their answers or should I lie about it as it can all be bought at any moment? – Black Mamba Apr 23 '18 at 4:30
  • +1 for I have a six year old laptop that I can use in a corner of the kitchen, while looking after my four little children". – I am the Most Stupid Person Apr 23 '18 at 6:43
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    @BlackMamba "I don't have a suitable hardware or environment as I never fell a need for it", but "it can all be bought at any moment". That seems to be a good answer to there question (might need to change the wording slightly). Lies are hard to keep up with. For all you know they offer some extra money for a good setup! – Jeroen Apr 23 '18 at 9:53
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How should I answer it and what is expected to be a good answer as I've not ever worked remotely.

Well, I would say that there isn't any "wrong" answer. To work remotely there are many possible configurations.

The obvious natural reason is to be honest and tell the truth, and specify what your hardware is, or whatever they prompt to you. This will become evident soon enough, and there is no point in deceiving for benefit (it will actually harm you on the long run).

Besides that, you can also invest on "better" hardware for your gear, so you are well prepared for any remote job (dual or triple screen, some really smooth mouse, an ergonomic keyboard, etc.). This investment can have further benefits than the ones anticipated.

Although to be honest, a good programmer could write his/her code on paper (or pseudo-code), regardless of the means to implement it. But, as in any application, you have to truthfully answer whatever it is prompted and give it some "spice" for it to be effective.

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