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I came to the United States three years ago to work in a very specific subfield of the marketing industry, where my value proposition was directly tied to my native language and a foreign market.

I've been very lucky, and grateful, to get my immigration paperwork done in a relatively short time. I then decided to enter the US job market and shift my career into a more relevant route, preferably content marketing for technology startups.

I thought I was ready; while it's true the only experience I have is relevant when it comes to a certain language and market, I spared no effort to learn and stay up-to-date on the industry current practices and trends.

A couple of months and a dozen of unsuccessful applications later, I realized it's a tougher gambit than one might think.

Although I structured my resume in a way that was relevant to the industry's current practices, explaining my career experience and highlighting my skills in a personalized cover letter, there hasn't been any real progress yet. One company got back to me, explaining that my skillset "is only applicable to a foreign market."

I'm targeting small, fast-growing technology startups looking for marketing professionals, but I'm afraid my experience in a foreign market and language-or lack thereof in the US market- is hurting my chances.

My question is: How to make sure a similar rejection won't happen again? Or in other words, how can I effectively get past the resume selection phase so I can explain how I'll be an addition to the workplace I'm targeting?

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    The issue here might be that you are targeting startups, which more than likely have limited budget and would normally be usually targeting domestic customers. So what you need to do is prove yourself in the domestic market - since small startups are a non-runner, perhaps aim for a more established company? – user1666620 May 28 '18 at 21:15
  • How are you positioning yourself when you apply? Are you selling yourself as a specialist in your native language, or emphasizing your more general skills? What do you know about content marketing for technology startups? – Seth R May 29 '18 at 5:16
  • The first job is always the hardest. I agree with @user1666620 startups have more cash constraints than established companies. – jcmack May 29 '18 at 19:38
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I'm targeting small, fast-growing technology startups

A small technology startup might not need any marketing your your home country, so targeting a larger, international company might give more results if your resume is tailored towards your knowledge for your country. Try to focus on a more generalized approach to marketing instead.

A couple of months and a dozen of unsuccessful applications

Another thing you need to realize is that you might need close to hundreds of applications before you get a response. From my experience, even people who were born and raised in America need to send out hundreds of applications.

In essence what I am trying to say is to fine tune your resume a bit more to be more applicable to the American market and to not be discouraged.

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It's difficult to find a job abroad. To find my first one I sent more than 200 applications. So it might be a question of you not sending enough applications. Mind you, I don't know the US labor market.

Another possible reason may be your application documents which are not suited to the US market. In many countries for example no references are expected. As far as I understand, in the US they are a vital part of the application.

Another point are your competences. Marketing and especially content marketing is an area in which you normally work for a market you know very well, both in terms of the language and the culture. So you should apply for positions with companies that do marketing for your home country. It's similar for PR.

The question is however, what country you come from. If it's a country with cheaper labor costs than the US, like many Asian countries, companies probably look for marketing employees directly in the country you come from.

Another question is how many people speaking your country are living in the US. If it's difficult to find a native speaker you have better chances of course.

Basically, IT, medicine and STEM professions are relatively easy to "sell" in a foreign country. Marketing, PR, journalism and similar is very difficult to get into.

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A couple of months and a dozen of unsuccessful applications later

This is a relatively small number of applications in the US job market. You should be expecting to send out over 100 applications and receive several rejections and dozens of non-responses.

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    Although you got a good point, this does not answer the question asked on: "How to make sure a similar rejection won't happen again? Or in other words, how can I effectively get past the resume selection phase so I can explain how I'll be an addition to the workplace I'm targeting? " ... mind addressing that issue as well? – DarkCygnus May 28 '18 at 23:40

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