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This question already has an answer here:

So here I am, with a retail application in my hand (it’s a digital one, and I have no way of asking my employer) and I’m at the part with two check boxes. Option one? Part time. Option two? Full time. If I choose to check off full time how many hours a day/ a week will I likely receive?

P.s I am currently 16 and will turn 17 early July.

marked as duplicate by DarkCygnus, Masked Man, Mister Positive, Lumberjack, gnat May 29 '18 at 20:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I'm guessing 8 hours a day? That I believe is something you can answer by asking them right there now that you have the application. – DarkCygnus May 29 '18 at 16:05
  • I'm guessing you are in Minnesota, based on your last posts? – DarkCygnus May 29 '18 at 16:09
  • Indeed @DarkCygnus – Hobo_warrior May 29 '18 at 16:09
  • @Hobo_warrior I think the previous post you wrote satisfies this query, as the maximum hours a minor can work at Minnesota were covered in the answers there. – DarkCygnus May 29 '18 at 16:15
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    @Hobo_warrior please do not name specific employers. That will get your question closed as off topic – Richard U May 29 '18 at 16:17
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You may work up to eight hours per day, with no more than a total of 40 hours per week.

According to Minnesota State law

Full-time is considered more than 30 hours per week, according to the Affordable care act, so you will get between 30 and 40 hours.

This is all assuming that you are hired full-time. Many retailers do not do so, and full-time positions are usually management. They may hire you part-time and track you into management. if you express an interest

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Some retail employers will limit the hours of teens to 30 or less. My son (19yo and just finished his freshman year in college) is scheduled on average 30 hours a week or less (during the summer). Anything more than that for a regular schedule he would be considered full-time and they would have to offer benefits.

He does keep the job year-around by working one weekend a month during the school year and lots of hours (which do not qualify as full-time as it's temporary/seasonal) from November-January. We're thrilled he's got this job as he doesn't have to find a summer job (which get's him out of the house and away from the video games).

Good luck!

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There are a lot of potential/related questions here and it's unclear exactly which one you're trying to ask.

How many hours am I allowed to work, maximum?

Your last question covered that and it's mentioned in another answer - 40 hours, by state law.

When someone says "full time," how many hours does that usually mean?

That depends on who the "someone" is. Culturally, in the US, full time generally means 40 hours (from the practice of working 5 days at 8 hours each day). Legally, in the US, over 30 hours generally means full time (in terms of the employer having to offer you the "full time" benefits package, including healthcare, etc.) Further, a company's HR policy may specify a specific number of hours expected from full time employees, i.e. 37.5 hours (5 days of 7.5 hours each).

Finally, your question may be read as,

If I check the box on the application indicating I want a Full Time status, how many hours will I likely get?

This is a hard question to answer on-topic here, since it is dependent on that specific company's policies. However, there are a few general trends, at least within the big-box-chain retail sector:

  • Employers are generally reluctant to have actual full time staff, since that means they need to spend a significant amount of money on benefits (healthcare). For this reason, it's common for these employers to have a large number of part time staff
  • Further, the full-time benefits package is often seen as an investment into a specific person, so it's not often given to employees unless the company considers them valuable in the long term. A younger person applying for a summer job probably won't fit this criteria - they'd rather give the benefits to someone experienced looking for longer-term employment.

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