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During a small talk, a colleague (old employee in my new job) asked "do you like it here?", and then I replied something like "too bad, documentation is not available".

Later on, my boss extended my probation and now terminated my contract.

Someone told me that I said something I should not have told, especially to indirect colleagues.

Do I deserve to be fired for having understated that what was a given in my previous company is absent in my current one?

closed as off-topic by gnat, scaaahu, Richard Says Reinstate Monica, Dmitry Grigoryev, Dukeling Jun 11 '18 at 12:00

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  • 13
    What makes you think your contract was not extended (only) because you made that remark? – Brandin Jun 11 '18 at 4:34
  • 32
    It's hard to tell whether or not you deserve something, but it sounds like a pretty terrible place to work to me... – Erik Jun 11 '18 at 5:23
  • 7
    What is your goal here? My personal opinion is you don't deserve to be fired for giving your opinion, especially since you were prompted to do so. – Masked Man Jun 11 '18 at 5:23
  • 18
    Let's turn the question around: do you want to work in a company where you can speak your mind only if it agrees with the management's view? – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Jun 11 '18 at 5:51
  • 4
    I strongly suspect that we're not getting the full story here, and it's entirely possible that you aren't getting the full story either. – Michael Kay Jun 11 '18 at 11:21
63

This is the best thing that could have happened to you.

Just like an interview, a probation period is a two way street. Now you know that the company doesn't follow industry standard practices, and that the boss won't allow workers to express their opinions.

Both of these would be immediate deal breakers for me.

So, polish your CV, start your job hunt, and see what you can do to smooth things over with your boss if you think you will have to give him as a reference.

20

"do I deserve" means that the decision is somewhere in the justice/injustice scale. It is not.

In the corporate setup, there is no justice. There are decisions based upon perception. The whole story seems to be that during your probation period, they had a perception of you being a bad fit. Wether it's deserved or not does not matter. What does matter is that they did fear you would be a bad cultural fit.

Which leads to Mawg's excellent answer : was this company a bad fit for you? Probably, as you seem to be a free speaker, and this company seems to value more deferent behaviours. That's the important thing. Usually a free speaker can't keep his tongue for a very long time, and you would not have fit there anyways. Better leave early.

Is it fair? Probably no. Is it deserved? Probably no. Is it a good thing for your career? In the grand scheme of things, that's likely. I'd even say that your health is the first winner there - working in such an authoritarian setup when you don't fit the authoritarian requirements is excessively draining and stressful. Better leave the place to someone used to keep his mouth shut. You both will be happier.

14

It's a red flag that your colleague appears to have been told more about your employment than you (from your comment above in answer to Brandin), but these sort of conversations are notoriously unreliable - it would be a good idea to ask your supervisor directly why they were not continuing with your employment. If you approach it as a genuine desire to learn, no reasonable person would refuse to give you an answer.

That said, it may be that you're not dealing with reasonable people - there's enough here to suggest that's at least a possibility. In that case things are unlikely to improve after probation and - as Mawg says - probation is as much about you assessing the employer as the other way.

Give the supervisor the chance to explain the reasoning - at worst you'll know that you behaved more professionally than others.

  • Additionally it is interesting to know whether the other employee felt uneasy that you might be bashing on their current practices so told something worse than what actually happened. If she likes current situation and feels more secure without proper documentation, then she didn't want you there to change things. – akostadinov Jun 11 '18 at 8:49

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