2

When looking for CV templates (I use latex), I chose this one:

https://www.overleaf.com/latex/examples/resume-example/vmjzzkmgdjst#.WyVGLFUzbDc

Mainly for its simplicity. I think we can call it has classic visual as opposed to more modern. However, on some forums I saw people mentioning the Latex package it uses, to get rid off, since it was old.

My question is (especially since there maybe people experienced in recruiting here) would you consider the visual this CV has bad? (old?) and because of this think poorly about the candidate? and prefer CV with more modern visual layout?

5

It is highly unlikely that a choice of a resume template is going to matter unless you choose something that is really, really unique (which will almost certainly work against you). In fact, there is a pretty decent chance that computers, not humans, will be the primary consumers of your resume. It is relatively common that your resume is just loaded into an HR system, parsed, and then searched. As long as the computer can read your resume, formatting is unlikely to matter.

The bigger concern is likely to be using LaTeX. Word documents are, by far, the most common format for a resume in most industries. Lots of recruiters will want a Word resume because they need to manipulate it beore sending it along to the client (removing the contact information, adding the recruiting company logo, etc.). If you use LaTeX, you may spend a fair amount of time having the same conversation with a bunch of different recruiters about why you don't have a Word version of your resume. Unless you have a particularly rare skillset that makes recruiters likely to bend or you are intentionally trying to use this as a way of weeding out companies you don't want to work for, you'll make your life easier if you just use Word.

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