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I am about to have a third interview for a new position in my company. I was told the third interview would be the time to talk salary/start dates, etc. This position would be in a new area for me, so I don't have prior experience with what to expect salary wise. This new position is sales based as well, so I am seeing a massive range when I look up expected salaries. The nature of the work is intensely private, so it is also impossible to find other people who do the same type of sales.

Since this position is "in house" for me I do have access to the contact information of the two people whose team I would be joining, and I have met each of them before (this is a new position, I am not replacing anyone or taking over duties held by anyone currently here).

My question is, In these circumstances, could I reach out to my potential co workers and ask what a reasonable salary range for this position is?

I realize that this is a very private question, but I am hoping that asking for a range instead of a specific number offsets that. If I could find anything specific at all I wouldn't even consider asking, but again my research turns up a range of anywhere from $35,000 to $90,000. Thanks in advance!

  • Why not just ask about the salary range from the recruiter or HR rep who you're working with on the interviews? – dwizum Jun 18 '18 at 14:38
  • Remember that existing employees of equal level will have a lower salary than what you can (and should) get. – Juha Untinen Jun 18 '18 at 14:47
  • @dwizum I found this job listing independently, and contacted the president of our division directly about it. There is no HR rep or recruiter involved. – citrus128 Jun 18 '18 at 15:04
  • The job is with your current employer? All the more reason to ask HR what pay grade the position is in. – dwizum Jun 18 '18 at 15:26
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DO NOT reach out to future co-workers, they are not qualified to answer that question, nor can you compare what they make to what you make. I'd personally feel very uneasy answering that question, and it may be viewed as trying to subvert the hiring process.

DO reach out to the hiring manager/ HR department and ask what an appropriate salary range for this position is. Actually, I would have gotten that out of the way before I started face-to-face interviews. A range is just a range, but you can expect an offer to you to be more toward the lower range. Plan to talk them up.

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In these circumstances, could I reach out to my potential co workers and ask what a reasonable salary range for this position is?

It would not really be in their best interests to talk money with you, as they don't know you and salary can be a touchy subject.

Perhaps a better idea would be to go into LinkedIn, contact people that USED TO work there and don't anymore, and ask them about salary. These people would have fewer reasons to not talk to you, and you may get some unbiased good info.

And as Sandra stated above, 'Whoever talks salary first loses'.

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I would strongly advise against reaching out to others.

At best, it would seem unprofessional as you may make your coworkers uncomfortable.

At worst, depending on company policies, contracts, and legal obligations, this could result in termination. While the worst case scenario is unlikely, it is still something to consider.

Since there are plenty of websites such as salaries, glassdoor, dice, et cetera, it is an unnecessary risk with too many possible repercussions.

Check websites, reach out to others in your industry, but do not go internal.

The ideal would be if you could find someone external that has knowledge about your company.

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