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I was hired by a new employer about 3 months ago. During the process, I submitted a resume multiple times, had an interview, and all my references were called.

On my resume, I mistakenly had a part-time contracting job listed for 2013-2015. However, the correct date was 2014-2016. During the interviews and communications with the pertinent references, the correct date range was discussed and it was never identified that my resume was wrong.

Recently, my employer asked me to resubmit my resume in a different format. During the process of updating and corrected my resume, I realized my mistake.

As I resubmit my resume, should I notify my employer about the incorrect information?

marked as duplicate by Mister Positive, gnat, scaaahu, OldPadawan, gazzz0x2z Jun 29 '18 at 8:34

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  • Why do you want to do that? Or why wouldn't you? – DarkCygnus Jun 28 '18 at 16:48
  • I don't think is a duplicate @DavidK. Perhaps relevant or realted, but that one is asking before getting hired (while job-hunting). This case, OP is already hired and asked to resubmit his resume. Also, in that other case the poster actually changed the year interval, making the time worked there different than the truth, here the dates were shifted but the time worked remained truthful. – DarkCygnus Jun 28 '18 at 17:02
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    @DarkCygnus Thanks, you make very good points. I voted too quickly on that one. Close vote retracted. – David K Jun 28 '18 at 17:18
  • Also different, though related @gnat that one also extended the real time worked by accident. Here, OP just shifted them – DarkCygnus Jun 28 '18 at 19:56
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This was a mistake and not a lie. The company would have hired you anyway. Therefore bringing it up now will either be ignored or cause an unnecessary distraction for someone. Correct the mistake in the new resume and leave it at that.

This assumes you don’t work in an industry that puts a very high bar on honesty and is suspicious by nature. For example, secret government work or financial oversight. In that case it is better to reveal everything.

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    Even in those industries, as long as you’re forthcoming a genuine mistake isn’t likely to be a problem. – cpast Jul 1 '18 at 17:56
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The correct years are more recent, and for the same length of time. It will be obvious to your employer that this was a completely innocent mistake. I can't imagine it will make any difference at all to your standing in the company.

It seems so unimportant to me that I'm not even sure I would bother mentioning it.

If you really would like to point out the error, you could perhaps just mention it as an aside in the email. Something like...

p.s. I noticed while editing this that the years for my previous contract were slightly incorrect, so I've corrected it in this version.

I really doubt though that anyone would ever notice the discrepancy, much less be bothered by it.

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You don't need too, but you could if you'd like. A mistake as small as this won't have any negative effect with your employer and it's likely they wont cross reference the updated resume with your old one.

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As I resubmit my resume, should I notify my employer about the incorrect information?

Seems that 2013-2015 is two years period, as well as 2014-2016, so you didn't say you had worked more time than you actually did (which is good).

I don't see why not mention it, but don't just do it lightly. This is something that could well be overlooked (as it happened before when you were being recruited).

I doubt this is going to be an issue, as you are already hired and the dates were just shifted (and not misleadingly extended). If it makes you feel at peace then I suggest you proceed, but besides that this I doubt would serve any purpose.

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