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Its a back office temp analyst position with goldman sachs, if that matters.

marked as duplicate by Dukeling, gnat, scaaahu, Michael Grubey, OldPadawan Jul 2 '18 at 10:34

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via recruiter, unless you know someone there. you have roughly zero chance going through a large company's online application - it just never works, there are too many people who apply.

the recruiter will give you a leg up - however slim. it's still, of course, not a guarantee.

it is much easier if you know someone at the firm to recommend you, which will get you put front and center in front of decision makers. failing that, a recruiter, failing that you should network to know someone there to recommend you.

online portals are a waste of your time for anything but startup companies, don't bother.

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    I've gotten plenty of interviews by applying directly to both small and large companies. Would a recruiter do anything more than charge a substantial fee to do some basic filtering of candidates that a dedicated employee can also do (and probably do better), and that one can possibly even automate (depending on how good the recruiter is), and maybe give candidates tips you don't want them to get? Why do you argue that going through a recruiter will give you a leg up? – Dukeling Jul 1 '18 at 8:34
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    @Dukeling a dedicated employee might be able to do a better job than a recruiter, but that assumes an FTE is dedicated to this task. – emory Jul 1 '18 at 23:43
  • @Dukeling you seem to be answering from the employer's POV? As the employee, being put forward by a recuiter is easier than applying via the company site. The recruiter putting you forward - and they generally don't put 100 people forward, because what's the point of using them if they do that - bypasses the filtering mechanism the company uses, which thus gives you, the candidate, the leg up. – bharal Jul 3 '18 at 12:17
  • @bharal My point is that if the company doesn't want to work with the recruiter, there isn't much point to trying to apply through them (them contacting you about a position doesn't necessarily mean the company agreed to use them, but I'm not sure how likely this is). Although there is a good point here that, if they're contacting you, they're much more likely to send through your application than if you were blindly applying through them. I'd probably judge it based on how much effort the recruiter put in to their message (does it look like they actually bothered to read my resume?). – Dukeling Jul 3 '18 at 17:13

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