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To give a brief outline of my situation:

I was lucky enough to get a full time job as a programmer for a large bank at the age of 19, straight out of college.

After working there for a few years I was made redundant at the end of last year and decided to take this as an opportunity to achieve a personal goal and go to university to get a computer science degree.

I am now looking for part time work, probably in some sort of service role, to support myself during my studies but have found myself in the situation where I have a pretty good CV that is tailored towards full time software development roles and am not sure how to modify it for a completely different industry.

Does anyone have any advice or experience in a similar situation?

  • I'm not sure what "different industry" we're talking about. Your title is discussing full-time vs. part-time. But it sounds like you'd still be in IT (my assumption based on the fact that you're working on a computer science degree). Are you talking about the difference between IT for a bank and IT for some other type of company? – Justin Cave Jul 3 '18 at 19:32
  • Did you considered a job in PC support on campus of your university, supporting your fellow students? That might be a major factor when selecting your university. – Peter M. - stands for Monica Jul 6 '18 at 14:57
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I am now looking for part time work, probably in some sort of service role, to support myself during my studies but have found myself in the situation where I have a pretty good CV that is tailored towards full time software development roles.

A software development role will always have some element of "soft skills" that would be relevant here - these are usually downplayed as it's usually (primarily) technical prowess that employers are interested in, but it sounds like this is a case where the reverse could be true.

So instead of listing technologies, projects, languages, etc. that you're familiar with prominently, you may choose to list any of the following (so long as they're relevant):

  • Clear user / developer documentation of software / libraries
  • Any management experience
  • Software / library testing in a clear, consistent and reproducible manner
  • Support, both in terms of developer support within the company, and user support externally
  • Expert IT skills

You certainly shouldn't look to downplay or alter the software development work that you've been doing - potential employers should find that impressive, even if it's not directly related to their industry. You should however concentrate on skills that will be relevant to the role that you're applying to, and cut down on any useless (to them) jargon.

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