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I am working with 2 companies, one full-time and one part-time. Should I only show my full-time company on my resume or both when applying for a new job? Both of these jobs are in the same field of work.

I am not sure how recruiters think. My resume doesn't specify if either of them is full time or part-time. Will they consider that I can work 2 jobs in parallel, so I must be good at it, or they will doubt whether I'll be dedicated if they hire me?

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    Are both jobs related to the position that you are applying for? Are you applying for a new full-time position? Do you intend to keep the part-time position if you get a new full-time position? – Justin Cave Jul 5 '18 at 20:14
  • Yes, both the jobs and the new one are related in some manner and I don't intend to keep the current ones if I get the new one. This question is not about one particular job I am applying for, but a general question – Sourabh Jul 5 '18 at 20:16
  • @downvoter reason? – Sourabh Jul 5 '18 at 20:21
  • @Sourabh I wouldn't bother expecting downvoters to give reasons, some of them are just people passing by – DarkCygnus Jul 5 '18 at 20:26
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In a resume/CV include all jobs that will help you get the job you are applying for. You are selling your experience.

Will they consider that I can work 2 jobs in parallel, so I must be good at it, or they will doubt whether I'll be dedicated if they hire me?

There is one word of caution. Some companies won't like it if an employee is working another job. They think it hurts their performance at the full time job. They especially don't like it if the second job is with a competitor. They worry about you helping the competition.

So if that second job doesn't help don't include it.

Of course if they are doing a background check and they require a complete work history, then include all the jobs, even the part times ones.

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@mhoran_psprep is exactly right with "In a resume/CV include all jobs that will help you get the job you are applying for. You are selling your experience." I also agree with his cautions but wanted to put a different perspective out there.

  • Do qualify your role, and the dates, I would expect to see something like:

    • a header for the company that is your full time work (dates of employment, company, current title), including the note that you are a full time employee.
    • a header for the company that is your part time work (same structure as the previous bullet), including the note that you are a part time employee.
    • a clear description of the work in each one. If you get something noticeably different out of these two jobs, make sure to spell out what is relevant. For example, I could see it being a nice thing if the part time job pays a lot less but gives you a greater sense of ownership or more ability to take risks or extend your skills.
  • Be ready to speak to it. If I were your hiring manager I would probably be asking myself - "why is this person working two jobs??"... is it that...

    • The full time job doesn't pay enough - understandable if this is a low-paying job, but if we're talking something in high demand like software development, this is harder to believe unless there's a debt-inducing skeleton in the closet.
    • The person is bored. If the person is bored... why? is s/he slacking in one of these jobs? Is s/he underutilized?
    • Also - how does this candidate recharge? And does s/he get enough sleep/food/life time? There's no universal truth on this, but I don't know very many people that REALLY can work two jobs continuously, one full time, that are largely similar (same field...) without burning out in a year or two.
    • Do both employers know about each other? It's a big difference if the person is working two jobs because s/he was able to pick up some extra cash consulting for two companies in a partnering relationship where presumably they can compromise on deadlines and timing.
    • What happens when there is a conflict of interest between timing? Are both jobs really such smooth sailing that this candidate never has to choose between missing deadlines?

I'd definitely be asking variants of these questions to you as a candidate. Some I could pose point blank -- "Why two jobs at once?", or "How do you recharge?" some I would probably pose from an experiential standpoint - "what happens when you have conflicting deadlines or urgent work in both jobs?".

Mileage varies significantly between industries. I know tons of people in the performing arts who have two or even 3-4 "jobs" - all in their chosen industry - as different artistic groups have different schedules, rehearsal expectations, etc and there can be enough fluidity in membership to accommodate schedule conflicts.

I've also seen cool stuff like engineers who also work as adjunct professors for their brand of engineering - both relate to skills in engineering, but there's a noticeably different pattern and pace. And adjunct professors can often plan their class schedules to fit with other job demands.

But the hard areas are often stuff like "knowledge work" where the time required to get something done is very hard to predict, and there's an assumption that brilliance could hit you at any time and that you'll work at least some weeks with a high number of hours to meet important deadlines when the project is in crisis. These areas can also have heavy intellectual property concerns.

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Should I only show my full-time company on my resume or both when applying for a new job?

Given that they are related to the new job you seek, I think you should show both.

Not only because it the truth, and saying otherwise could be seen as deceptive if recruiters find out about this other job, but also because it portrays you as a more experienced professional than just mentioning one.

No need to over think this one and wonder if this can be misinterpreted. At most, it shows that you are able to handle multiple tasks and responsibilities concurrently, in a professional level, without compromising one or the other.

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