1

I am really interested and I would really like to learn technologies that the company I work for doesn't use and need.

I want to learn C#(already started), MongoDB and serverless, possibly get AWS certified.

The problem is the company I work for just doesn't need them at the moment and learning without practice and building projects is pointless. So I will have to do this in my own time.

My question is how do I proceed? Should I just learn them and never use them professionally or should I look possibly for a different job opportunity?

closed as off-topic by Dukeling, Rory Alsop, L.Dutch, gnat, DarkCygnus Jul 16 '18 at 16:38

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for advice on a specific choice, such as what job to take or what skills to learn, are difficult to answer objectively and are rarely useful for anyone else. Instead of asking which decision to make, try asking how to make the decision, or for more specific details about one element of the decision. (More information)" – Dukeling, Rory Alsop, L.Dutch, gnat, DarkCygnus
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 5
    What do you want to do? That's really the only important part here. – Dukeling Jul 14 '18 at 15:47
  • 3
    Well, there was once a case where I practiced React.js in my freetime, and then there was a chance to do a prototype of a system at my work. We went with React mostly because I had already started learning it, and my colleagues had interest in it. Otherwise we would have used jQuery, which was the de facto frontend library at the office at that time. – Juha Untinen Jul 14 '18 at 16:31
  • 1
    " never use them professionally" - how do you know? You are a slave or something? Most people in your profession SO change jobs occasionally. Never is a long time. – TomTom Jul 15 '18 at 15:09
  • @TomTom yes you are right, maybe I am overthinking too much, after all it's all about the passion and what makes us feel good and coding just feels good. – squeekyDave Jul 15 '18 at 18:44
8

The problem is the company I work for just doesn't need them at the moment and learning without practice and building projects is pointless.

This has nothing to do with the company you work for. They hired you to perform a particular job with a particular set of skills. If you want to learn other things then that's really just up to you.

So I will have to do this in my own time.

As do I and everyone else.

What I can tell you is that most people don't. There are just a few people who are passionate about their skills enough to learn more on their own time. Most people will give up if it interferes with their life to much or they don't see a return on their efforts quick enough.

To really learn something it takes years.

My question is how do I proceed?

Slowly.

Each programming language is like a foreign country. You can learn to speak the language, but it takes time to understand the culture.

When you talk to other programmers who know that language. They can tell if you are a native or a foreigner.

The best way to proceed is to make new friends who are passionate about those skills. Volunteer to help them with their projects (i.e. open source). Contribute a little bit at a time and be consistent in your efforts (i.e. 10 hours every week).

Should I just learn them and never use them professionally or should I look possibly for a different job opportunity?

Chicken and egg problem. If you can get a new job for those new skills that is the shortest path to developing those skills (assuming it's a good place to work).

You should also go buy a lottery ticket if that happens.

Ask yourself why you're doing this? What motivates you and are you truly passionate about these technologies?

Live in the now and build things now you love with these new tools. The new job will come later.

  • The reason why I want to learn them is purely out of curiosity and because I want be a good employee if sometimes those skills are needed. Thank you for the perspective, I will make a not of the suggestions. – squeekyDave Jul 15 '18 at 18:40

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.