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Two weeks ago, I applied to a job located in LA (I live in the east coast). There was no section dedicated to the relocation issue; I just mentioned my willingness to move as a side note on the application.

One week ago, I was contacted by the company for a video interview. I mentioned during the interview that I live in the east coast and that I'm willing to relocate. The HR manager nodded her head and told me that she'd highlight this on my application. She didn't mention that they were looking exclusively for people located in LA.

The HR sent me afterwards an assignment to work on. I handed the assignment two days ago and she told me I'd hear back from them in a week.

While I was doing my research on the company in case they contacted me on a short notice for a second interview, I found the director of the hiring department wrote this on her LinkedIn profile:

[Company Name] is looking for a Ruby Developer (based in LA).

Now, I don't know if she meant the position is based in LA, or the person applying should be based in LA. Seems unclear to me.

I was thinking about sending an email to the HR manager to ask her about this, and mention that I'll be willing to relocate from my own pocket if they don't typically provide compensation for relocation.

The Question:

Should I send this email? My worry is that I might not get the job because I'm not located in LA. Should I highlight the fact that I will be immediately available and willing to relocate on my own?

Note

I've been following the company for a year now. I really want to join them and I'm aware of their work philosophy and the projects they work on. I already highlighted that in the assignment I've been given.

  • Based in LA means the position is based in LA. – UsernameNotFound Jul 24 '18 at 13:12
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I wouldn't send such declaration. In my opinion it will make you look desperate, and if they are considering helping you financially - you might miss out on that.

My understanding is that they didn't state anywhere in the offer that they provide relocation support, and if they are talking to you - they probably assume that you have read and understood the offer. So you applied even if that meant moving from your own budget if necessary.

Be patient, and good luck.

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[Company Name] is looking for a Ruby Developer (based in LA).

Now, I don't know if she meant the position is based in LA, or the person applying should be based in LA. Seems unclear to me.

That phrase means that the work location is LA. They expect that you will either be sitting in an office they own in the LA area, or that you will be working at customer sites in the LA area, or that you will be working from home but they will expect you to visit their LA area office or a customer office in the LA area frequently.

This means that they will not hire somebody who can't get to their LA office in a reasonable amount of time, so they will expect them to live during the work week in the LA area.

What is unclear is if they will help pay to move somebody from out of the area. If I was the one doing the interviews that would be an issue for me that would have to be resolved.

From the companies perspective the first part is to determine if you are willing to move (for you that is a yes). But the company also wants to know if you have a timeline for the move and who is paying for the move. The company doesn't want a misunderstanding becasue if they have no desire to pay for a move and you reject it because they aren't willing to pay, then everybody has wasted their time.

I mentioned during the interview that I live in the east coast and that I'm willing to relocate. The HR manager nodded her head and told me that she'd highlight this on my application. She didn't mention that they were looking exclusively for people located in LA.

They are highlighting your willingness to move to LA, otherwise somebody seeing that you live on the east coast would reject your application becasue yo live so far from their offices.

From your perspective I would talk to them about moving expenses if the lack of help is a deal breaker.

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