0

I encountered this question's answer and my question is somewhat related, though not entirely answered over there.

I recently graduated, and have almost a year of experience doing a PhD before dropping out (I had my reasons). Anyway, there's a company located near which I would like to work for. They are advertising senior positions which are R&D oriented, but require skills obtained in industry. So preferably PhDs with extra industry experience. Not selling myself short, but I definitely do not meet the description. Most if not all their vacancies are like that, and they do not mention accepting graduates.

In summary: What is the strategy for open application - enough threads and info on that - when the company seems only interested in senior profiles.

And would that even be a good idea? There are enough vacancies for me to apply elsewhere, and I think one option is indeed to gather experience in the industry and revisit this idea in a couple years?

2

there's a company located near which I would like to work for. They are advertising senior positions which are R&D oriented, but require skills obtained in industry. So preferably PhDs with extra industry experience. Not selling myself short, but I definitely do not meet the description. Most if not all their vacancies are like that, and they do not mention accepting graduates.

In summary: What is the strategy for open application - enough threads and info on that - when the company seems only interested in senior profiles.

The strategy is to apply, with a great cover letter that convincingly explains why you are a terrific candidate for the position. Then hope the reader will invite you in for an interview where you can go into more depth.

Don't point out your shortcomings in your letter - your resume will do that for you.

It's likely a waste of time. Employers tend to spend time on advertising the required qualifications for a reason. But it's your time to waste. And you never know - it only takes one employer to make a great job available.

6

As famous Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky once said:

"You miss 100 percent of the shots you never take."

Apply anyway, who cares? The worst they can say is "no", and are you really any worse off if they say "no"?

  • 3
    Sometimes companies oversell a position but will settle for "less." – Dan Jul 24 '18 at 14:52
0

Be bold, phone them up* and ask the question you have written here:

  1. Describe your situation. Be clear why you would want to work for them.

  2. Ask specifically how to do an open application with them. Do not ask if you would qualify (that increases the chance of prompting a no answer), they will tell you if you do not.

* Find out who to talk to, of course

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.