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I am not sure how to deal with coworker behavior which involves ignoring me or my comments that are on technical discussions because I lack a higher degree. There's also this perverse behavior, that seems to originate from one or two people, where I don't seem to gain any trust despite delivering results. If I wasn't delivering results which are proper by industry standards, efficient, and innovative, I wouldn't complain. I am not sure how to deal in this situation where there just seems to be a set opinion about me despite reality.

So is there anyway that I can shift this dynamic to address my main pain points?

  • They don't respond to me, and choose to respond to others in the same conversation

  • I am not invited to meetings where I did the work for something or am well-versed in how something works

  • I am not asked about my thoughts on something where I've already shown I can do something.

Edit: not a duplicate because it's not about social cues or me being loud or intrusive. It's also not a duplicate because this is not an academic environment.

closed as off-topic by gnat, Retired Codger, mcknz, paparazzo, Sandra K Jul 25 '18 at 19:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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    Can you clarify exactly what your question is? Is it how to deal with co-workers? Just want it clarified so the question doesn't get closed. – curt1893 Jul 25 '18 at 12:09
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    Are you sure it's because you don't have a degree? I'm in IT and I have no idea whether or not most of my coworkers even have degrees, unless we're friendly enough to have made small talk about where we went to school. They might not be taking your suggestions because you're relatively new, or because their idea is equally "correct" and easier for them to implement, or a whole lot of other reasons. Why do you think it's the degree? – Keiki Jul 25 '18 at 12:13
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    Yes, the question is how to deal with co-worker behavior in this situation. They are withholding their trust regardless of what I do. I am not sure what is the exact reason, maybe it's passive aggressiveness due to racism, though I don't believe that. It's most likely the lack of higher degree. I've been here for around a year, so not that new. I can't think of any other reason why what I say is ignored or dismissed without discussion. I actually would not mind being told if there's some way I can improve, like maybe I am offending someone by something I do. But I won't know unless I am told. – user3464534235342 Jul 25 '18 at 12:28
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    I think I mis-worded my question when I said "perceived". I meant to say that it could be handled differently. Being from Canada, I am a lot less tolerant of racist jokes than some of my Portuguese friends, for example. They constantly make anti-semetic comments and don't understand why it could be perceived as wrong, and they allege that it is quite common in Portugal to have this opinion. – TheRealLester Jul 25 '18 at 13:03
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this question is about the OP's perceptions, without any evidence. – Retired Codger Jul 25 '18 at 13:41
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IMHO, it looks like your position in the current environment is kinda set.

Also, you haven`t mentioned your relationship with immediate superior - are there any?

As an option is to gather knowledge confirmation documentation (i.e. degree, certifications on a specific topic etc), but even with these it would be a looooong road to the middle.

Perhaps, changing a workplace is faster solution in this case, and certifications would only help to land a better one

  • Can you elaborate more on why position is set? What does that even mean? – user3464534235342 Jul 25 '18 at 15:58
  • From your post i gathered that you are not content having your opinion dismissed and being cut out of meetings that in your opinion directly related to your position and skill set. In my experience, people seek outside counsel when things have been happening for some time. Based on these 2 premises i have came to this conclusion. Am i wrong? – Strader Jul 25 '18 at 20:01
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Document everything in writing. Keep records of everything going on.

They don't respond to me, and choose to respond to others in the same conversation.

Don't go to meetings unprepared. Make notes about the topics you wish to discuss and ask compelling questions. Review your notes before the meeting and try to reduce them to the most important.

Try to stay on topic in meetings and ask questions from your prepared list. After the meeting bring your list to the meeting organizer and ask "Please explain why these questions were not answered".

Keep your notes for your records. If they continue to not answer your questions you can bring the list to your boss or higher up and ask "Please explain why these questions were not answered".

If you don't keep a record of what is happening in meetings, then it's like the meetings never happened. When a co-worker does not answer questions it becomes a disciplinary issue, and there is little they can do to explain why they wouldn't answer a valid question.

I am not invited to meetings where I did the work for something or am well-versed in how something works.

Make a list of everything you've worked on. For each item on the list create a sub-list of questions related to that work.

If you know the meeting is going to happen present the meeting organizer with your list. Inform them that you have questions that need answering. Give them a copy of the list, and ask to receive the answers in writing.

If the meeting happens without your awareness then bring the list to the organizer and ask them to schedule another meeting to address your questions. Give them a copy of the list, and ask to receive the answers in writing.

If they don't answer the questions or the answers don't enable you to do your job, then bring these documents to your boss or higher up.

I am not asked about my thoughts on something where I've already shown I can do something.

Write it down.

Keep a log of all your ideas and how they would have improved the situation or provided a better solution. Don't write down anything negative about a coworker. Keep the logs on topic to the ideas only.

Review the log frequently and remove any ideas that someone can find fault with. You want a log of only ideas that can't be refuted.

When you have a long enough list of ideas and you feel comfortable with the list. Bring it to your boss or higher up. Ask why your ideas are being ignored.

  • When I say conversations, I say conversations in a social/discussing technical ideas context, and not just a work context. – user3464534235342 Jul 25 '18 at 15:54
  • @user3464534235342 this website is for work related questions. For social questions try interpersonal.stackexchange.com – user7360 Jul 25 '18 at 16:32
  • I disagree with the above sentiment because nothing exists in a vacuum. If you want to avoid answering that, that's your prerogative. – user3464534235342 Jul 25 '18 at 17:17
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I know for a fact that what I've said a few times was objectively proven or easy to confirm by a Google search

Just because something can be found on google doesn't make it true. Also, since you never shared the details of the particular event, what you said may not even be relevant to the situation at hand, truthful or not.

I am not sure how to deal with coworker behavior which involves ignoring me or my comments that are on technical discussions because I lack a higher degree.

It's unclear since you never spoken of a particular situation. If every co-worker is ignoring you, then it may be something wrong on your part. Either you're not listening to what is going on, or what you're saying may be irrelevant. It may also be that you're not assertive with your point. Have you proven to contribute to projects? My advice is to talk to your boss first, explain that you feel your inputs are ignored and ask how you can improve. Don't bring up bits about your degree or how you searched google.

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    > Have you proven to contribute to projects? Answer is yes. – user3464534235342 Jul 25 '18 at 13:52

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