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first question here - despite being a frequent visitor for however many years.

An internal post (Within my current workplace) was advertised which I'm very comfortable in the field - but not something I'd wish to do. It's significantly over my wage and I know I could do the given tasks, and provide far more additional support in the field than previous people in that role, purely off other internal experience which links heavily into advertised role.

My question in short is, how do I approach a company about a job I wouldn't like doing as much as my current job as it's not the field I particularly enjoy, when I feel my job should be higher paid (despite the new opening of this new job)? Do I apply and be honest that I'm applying because of the wage increase, or do I discuss it to a manager?

To put the title into perspective, I'm equally concerned that my role is something that should be higher paid, so could be rejected purely on that basis AND concerned that someone would replace my role on an undoubted higher wage.

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  • Hey there cluelessfella, by "internal post" what do you mean? That it is internal to your current company but on other Department?
    – DarkCygnus
    Commented Jul 27, 2018 at 21:48
  • Also, if I may suggest, I'd rephrase the questions you are asking. If you should do A or B is something that is really up to you (hence, off-topic here): if you prefer asking for a raise or looking for other job instead is your call. Seems to me that what you really feel is that you are underpaid, which is leading you to consider looking for other jobs, is that perception of mine correct?
    – DarkCygnus
    Commented Jul 27, 2018 at 21:50
  • "my role is something that should be higher paid" - have you considered just asking for a raise or promotion instead, or looking for a job somewhere else? Commented Jul 28, 2018 at 17:25
  • I don't think we can answer this question. How should we know if there are consequences in your particular organisation for a failed application on an internal job posting? How should we know if playing the job shuffle game is a viable method to raise your salary in your particular organisation?
    – Philipp
    Commented Jul 31, 2018 at 13:01

2 Answers 2

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It doesn't matter if you are an internal or an external applicant, in any case they are going to probe your qualifications and motivations during the interview.

Now, you state that this is

a job I wouldn't like doing as much as my current job as it's not the field I particularly enjoy

and, assuming they are looking for motivated people, you would be quickly rejected on that plain statement. Will this bring consequences on your current job?

Most likely not.

P.S. If you think you are underpaid, find a way to discuss it with your manager.

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My take is you need to decide for yourself what you value more: doing what you are doing for same pay while advocating for higher pay, OR doing something you don't want to be doing for higher pay.

To your specific question:

How do I approach a company about a job I wouldn't like doing as much as my current job as it's not the field I particularly enjoy, when I feel my job should be higher paid (despite the new opening of this new job)?

Do I apply and be honest that I'm applying because of the wage increase, or do I discuss it to a manager?

First, discuss the situation with your manager, but don't mention this specific other option. You can google for resources/SE answers on how to negotiate a raise or promotion, and follow that advice.

IF the manager does not budge and gives no solid promises and timeframes for making changes, and if you feel that you absolutely cannot wait any longer, then you should probably leave. It is your decision where to leave, however: whether to take a higher paying job doing what you don't want to be doing, or search outside of your company.

The situation as you paint it so far appears as a false dichotomy: you really have more options, so you should explore and incorporate these other options into your decision making process. There are other companies in the world. Sometimes people get stuck with these blinders that their current employer is the only thing under the sun where they see themselves working. There are usually all sorts of other options, and the most limiting factor is the person's perspective, not the actual situation.

So I invite you to think more broadly and put your current job in perspective. Are there other advantages/benefits that play into the equation? Things like a good reputation on the team, good team, good manager, good commute, good benefits, etc. The grass always looks greener elsewhere but in reality it is nowhere perfectly green. Good luck!

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