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I had an interview for a very large company. Following this interview a few of my ex-colleagues had told me they were aware of other people who had gone in for this job and some current colleagues of that company had mentioned that the jobs had been ring-fenced for specific people, but interviewing was still a requirement.

To cut a long story short, I didn't get the job. I have had many job interviews in the past and often regard them as learning experiences as they do vary depending on the company and the nature of the job.

My issue was that during the interviewing process, the job had changed and I was considered for the new job, however it also changed back after my telephone interview but I had the skills and experience for the first job so I proceeded once again. The questions in the interview were what I would have expected for that type of job, however when I finally got the feedback (which is always good to help you grow) the HR adviser had listed a number of things which weren't asked during the interview nor was any opportunity given for me to demonstrate that I had in fact had the experience they said I lacked as the questions were very focused and we were constrained by time.

As I said previously, I've been through interview processes many times for a number of large and small companies and have been unsuccessful on a number of occasions. It just feels very disappointing when you feel that you missed out and have no idea what to work on as the feedback was not relevant. I had mentioned this to the HR advisory on the phone (without sounding desperate) and they were quick to rush me off the phone.

How do I get the point that my feedback wasn't relevant to my interview, without coming across as being bitter about it? I would actually like to work for that company still at some point but I just feel that the situation wasn't handled very well and I wasn't given a fair chance.

EDIT: One of my friends had mentioned that maybe they were waiting for me to demonstrate the particular skills etc. However, I looked closely at what the job would entail and what the job specification stated. It's like I have experience in a number of different areas, but can't just list through them all as it's only really necessary to discuss "relevant" experience which is what they usually ask.

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    "Prior to this interview a few of my ex-colleagues had told me they were aware of other people who had gone in for this job and some current colleagues of that company had mentioned that the jobs had been ring-fenced for specific people, but interviewing was still a requirement." It sounds like you knew what you were gettings yourself into. Are you over the 40 years old or are you part of a protected class? If you are and if you are in the US, I suppose you could demand another interview as they changed the requirements after having interviewed you. I'm quite sure the EEOC wouldn't like that. – Stephan Branczyk Aug 3 '18 at 8:25
  • @StephanBranczyk This is a good point, They have similar things in place in the UK as well. What are the chances of getting the job second time of interviewing though as its obvious that the employer although has to do it fairly will not be in favour of the candidate. – Twyxz Aug 3 '18 at 8:30
  • "Is their any skill or experience that you are concerned are not up to your needs that I can be given the opportunity to alleviate that concern before I go?" Or something like that, should be asked before you leave any interview. At the very least, that should prevent them assuming you don't have experience with something that you do. Whether your experience is at the level of their needs is another matter. – Dunk Aug 3 '18 at 21:31
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I've heard of this situation in a couple situations and it is a common issue that arises.

the job had changed

This shows that the company themselves were very unsure of what they wanted themselves in terms of a role and an employee.

feedback was not relevant

If the feedback was not relevant it's very possible that they mixed up candidates or they were indeed 'Ring-Fenced' and they were just trying to make up excuses as for reasons why you didn't get the job.

How do I get the point that my feedback wasn't relevant

If the organisation you applied for is a big company you can make a formal complaint about it or you could simply contact the person who was in contact with you pre-interview and ask them about it to see what they say.

I understand that not getting a job can be disheartening and although it's hard to admit. It's sometimes not even anything that you could've done better and other candidates may have been better or just simply favoured by the manager. Although illegal in some countries it is often the case that things like this happen unfortunately.

Theres not much you can change if this is the case unless you can prove that you were unfairly interviewed and not given a proper chance.

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How do I get the point that my feedback wasn't relevant to my interview, without coming across as being bitter about it? I would actually like to work for that company still at some point but I just feel that the situation wasn't handled very well and I wasn't given a fair chance.

There is nothing to be gained by complaining about the feedback you received, or your feelings about not being given a fair chance. It won't get you this job, or another shot at this job, nor will it make you seem like a more desirable candidate for any future jobs.

You are clearly bitter, and it will come across that way no matter how you phrase it.

Keep it to yourself, particularly if you want to have any chance of being hired by this company at some point in the future.

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