4

During his tenure with us he was undergoing training in functionality safety and has not added any value to the organization. He was relived from his services immediately after his resignation.

Sincerely,

I resigned from a small company after 3 months of joining due to some issues. I was relieved immediately after my resignation. They have added the above remark in my relieving letter.

Will this remark affect my future career prospects?

6

For dealing with hr, it may affect any future applications. I would consider if it would be worthy mentioning the experience on your CV.

However, if you are dealing with an experienced professional that knows an employee only starts adding value around 1 year, he may see through it that it was written in spite and your former bosses were unprofessional doing it. At the end of the day, your former employers are the ones that come in a bad light with that letter.

Also, after a couple of years in your new job, it will be mostly irrelevant for a new position that you had a 3 month gig that did not go well. It happens to the best in the industry.

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    Thanks Riberio for your answer. I also feel exactly the same as you although I wanted the opinions of experienced professionals on this forum. I joined a new product based company today. – Rakesh M R Aug 6 '18 at 13:19
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Yes, every remark has a certain impact, whether positive or negative.

You should expect questions about this remark in interviews and have some good explanation ready at hand.

You should also learn about the meaning of relieving letters in your country. In some countries they have little meaning while in others there is a secret language involved. In Germany, for example,

He always tried to deliver good results.

is a very bad remark. It means, you tried but were not able to actually produce good results. If this kind of secret language is typical in your country, this remark is even worse than it reads.

Continueing in your carrer, you should avoid including this relieving letter in any application at all cost. Only give it to an employer if he asks for all previous relieving letters.

I'd say you are lucky they didn't choose a harsher phrase. Not adding value to a company in the first 3 month might be something you can explain.

  • Thanks for your answer. There is no secret language as such but depends on how the company interprets it. The remark was put deliberately since they were very unhappy after I decided to resign. – Rakesh M R Aug 4 '18 at 18:34
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Yes.

Assuming that you are required to show relieving letter at any point - it will affect your future. You may have to settle on a lower salary, or less senior role in next job.

Don't get too discouraged, try to fix yourself in whatever was the reason of such remark, and find new job where you can shine.

  • why do you say this? OP left during training so didn't add any value, why would this affect salary or seniority? and if so, for how long? 1 month? 10 years? – bharal Aug 4 '18 at 7:41
  • I interpret such notice as polite way of saying that someone failed their job somehow. And OP doesn't ask for how long but if you are looking for timeframe - I suggested the next job, which may happen tommorow, or after 10 years. – Drakemor Aug 4 '18 at 10:13
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    Actually I have an offer from a product based company y right now with me. I have mentioned to them about my 3 months experience and the reason for resigning. – Rakesh M R Aug 4 '18 at 18:21
  • Congratulations on your offer. You haven't mention the reason for resigning on your question, so I don't see how is that related, nevertheless, good luck. – Drakemor Aug 4 '18 at 18:27
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    Thank you drakemor. Since I was there for only 3 months I can justify why no value was added. And I haven't submitted this letter to the new company yet. I was just wondering how would they react to this remark . – Rakesh M R Aug 4 '18 at 18:32

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